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The Faith and Reason LLC

Preceptorials Linked to the Faith and Reason LLC 2013-2014

BIOL 190: Introduction to Evolution COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies
PHIL 101: Introduction to Logic PHYS 270: Introduction to Physical Science, Mechanics, and Modeling the Natural World
PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology THRS 112: Faith and Reason in World Religions
THRS 114: God-Talk in the Real World: An Introduction to Theology  

BIOL 190: Introduction to Evolution

Preceptor: Dr. Sue Lowery
Credit: Life Science Core / 3 UNITS

This one-semester foundation course for Biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance, evolution, and ecology. Three hours of lecture weekly. No prerequisite.

COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

Preceptor: Dr. Eric Pierson
Credit: Social Science Core / 3 UNITS

This course offers an introduction to the examination of media and media literacy. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of radio, television, and cable are addressed. Fulfills a core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

PHIL 101: Introduction to Logic

Preceptor: Dr. Harriet Baber
Credit: Logic Core / 3 UNITS

The study of arguments, including basic principles of traditional logic and modern sentential logic. Topics include recognizing arguments premises, conclusion; induction and deduction, fallacies and sentential inference forms.

PHYS 270: Introduction to Physical Science, Mechanics, and Modeling the Natural World

Preceptors: Drs. Rae Anderson and Greg Severn
Credit: Physical Science Core / 4 UNITS

This course uses an innovative organization of physical concepts and skills to introduce students to mechanics, a branch of physics that deals with how physical interactions between objects affect their motion. Emphasis will be placed on the role that mechanics plays in the grand field of physics. As such, students will also be exposed to several other fields of modern physics, such as relativity, particle physics, and astrophysics, and learn how different fields and concepts are related to each other. Cutting edge scientific research is increasingly interdisciplinary and relies on computational methods which will be used to augment our experimental work in the lab. Students will learn to approach problems and topics in the same way that modern physicists do, using tools that include analytical mathematics, estimations, conceptual reasoning, and computer programming. Moreover, we will study scientific advances with the goal of understanding better the interplay among advances in technology, mathematics, and physics. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or equivalent, and concurrent registration in PHYS 270LL; concurrent registration in MATH 151 recommended.

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology

Preceptor: Dr. Annette Taylor
Credit: Social Science Core / 3 UNITS

This core curriculum course takes a scientific approach to the study of psychology, covering traditional areas of behavior including biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, memory, intelligence, emotion and motivation, personality, psychopathology and therapy, and social psychology. An emphasis on taking a scientific approach with critical thinking is intended to provide tools for life-long learning across a wide variety of disciplines, as well as in everyday life.

THRS 112: Faith and Reason in World Religions

Preceptor: Fr. Ron Pachence
Credit: Theology and Religious Studies Core / 3 UNITS

An introduction to the phenomenon of religion, indigenous religions and the major faith traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Topics to be covered include founders and important personalities of the traditions, their major canonical texts, teachings, practices and contemporary issues.

 

THRS 114: God-Talk in the Real World: An Introduction to Theology

Preceptor: Dr. Emily Reimer-Barry
Credit: Theology and Religious Studies Core / 3 UNITS

Can belief in a Creator God cohere with acceptance of evolution?  What does my image of God have to do with the way I live my life?  What contributions have Catholics made to public policy debates on just war and peacemaking?  This course will address these and other questions that link faith and reason in the contemporary context.  The course will present an introduction to the Catholic tradition, which assumes that faith and reason are interrelated.  Given the importance of the Bible for Christians, we will spend some significant time on the Bible and methods of interpreting the Bible, including feminist hermeneutics.  Authors we encounter later in the semester will give students a sense of the complexity of the institution of the Catholic Church, of its mission rooted in praxis, and of ongoing ecclesial dialogue about important contemporary questions, including war/peacemaking.  This is an introductory survey course designed to prepare students for upper-division courses in Christian theology at USD.