Courses Linked to the Engage TLC

2019-2020

Each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

 

ARTH 140: The Buddhist Temple

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jessica Patterson
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Must be taken in first year.


COMM 265: Introduction to Research

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jonathan Bowman
Core Area: Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 3 units

An introduction to communication research methodologies. Students are exposed to the prevailing paradigms of qualitative and quantitative research. The interpretive, descriptive, and explanatory foundations of research methodologies will be examined. Ethical principles governing the process of research will also be explored.


ENGL 304W: Advanced Composition

TLC Faculty: Prof. Lisa Smith
Core Area: Advanced Writing Competency | 3 units

In this course students will read autobiography and memoir in order to explore the way writers contextualize the self in the larger frameworks of family, community, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, nationality, historical moment, etc. By doing this students will consider the ways the self is shaped by these circles of influence and how through writing we see how we express these many faceted selves and connect with others.


ENGL 358: Staging America

TLC Faculty: Dr. Cynthia Caywood
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

The course examines how the idea of America and what it means to be American has been staged in our theatres. We will examine plays about both American dream and the American nightmare and considering their political and cultural contexts. We will also study the elements of drama to understand them generically and as performances. The class will see several productions, on film and, if possible, live, thus taking advantage of San Diego’s rich theatre community. Texts might include August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992; David Henry Hwang, Yellowface; Stephen Sondheim, Assassins; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Lin Manuel Miranda, In the Heights; Lynn Nottage, Sweat.


ENGL 358: Contemporary Ethnic Dystopia

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our scores for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin's The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee's On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany's Trouble on Triton, and Omar El Akkad's American War. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera's Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron's Children of Men.


ENGL 358: United States Ethnic Literature (Indigenous Literatures and Rhetoric)

TLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Studies in African-American, Asian-American/Pacific Islander, Chicano/Latino, and Native-American literatures. May be taught from a comparatist perspective and include other U.S. ethnic groups. Historical, political, and cultural material may be provided as context.


ENGL 363: Pronouns and Participatory Reading

TLC Faculty: Dr. Atreyee Phukan
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Engaging with issues of diversity and social justice in a global context, this course examines literature and other cultural forms and media from various geographic regions, including Africa, South Asia, the Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Caribbean.


HIST 115: History of the Cold War

TLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Gonzalez
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry & Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This class will fulfill the Historical Inquiry/Critical Thinking and Information Literacy criterion for USD’s academic core. To that end, the class will examine the Cold War and its impact on American culture. We will open the class by discussing the origins of Soviet authoritarianism and then examine the differences between capitalism and communism. Next, we focus on the United States and ask how Americans prepared for the struggle against the Soviet Union. The class will then cover American foreign policy and examine how the Cold War influenced domestic issues in the United States. The class will close by discussing the nuclear arms race and show how the struggle to deploy atomic weapons changed the Soviet Union and the United States. The class will be challenging, but fun, and students will be expected to master the material.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

TLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry & Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

The great flourishing of arts and culture in Italy during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance is called Humanism. This movement, as the name suggests, redefined the concept of the human being and his or her place within the context of the familial, civic, and even global community. Every affirmation of the human being’s beauty, dignity, and goodness, however, also introduced infinite questions: What are the responsibilities and rights of individuals in society? What are the causes and effects of misrule? What are proper church-state relations? Students will investigate these questions, as well as ask others: Did Humanism truly exalt all humankind? Was the Renaissance a time of improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? How do our answers to these question reshape our perceptions of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance? In this course, students will examine the unique role of Humanism within the development of Western civilization, as well as challenge the very concepts of “civilization” and “progress” by considering the new literary, spiritual, and human values that emerged during the Italian Renaissance through differing lenses. This course is taught in English and all texts will be read in English translation.


PHIL 116: Morality and Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Harriet Baber
Core Area: Ethical Inquiry | 3 units

This course aims to provide a thorough introduction to key themes in ethics and political philosophy, i.e., morality and justice. Students will be introduced to foundational questions in ethics such as: why be moral? What is the nature of the good and the good life? What are our duties to other humans? To animals? To ourselves? Students will also be introduced to foundational questions concerning justice: when, if ever, is paternalism justified? What is the moral justification of punishment? How far to our speech rights extend? Are their expressive harms that the state should regulate, like hate speech? What are our duties, if any, to persons in other nations suffering from economic deprivation and starvation?


POLS 371: American Foreign Policy

TLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the challenges and opportunities facing American foreign policy in the 21st century. Students examine the historical legacy and internal and external constraints on foreign policy decision making. Students also study theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations and discuss their relevance to an empirical analysis of American foreign policy.


PSYC 346: Evolutionary Psychology

TLC Faculty: Dr. Rebekah Wanic
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

The goal of this course is to examine and evaluate the evolutionary perspective as it relates to the study of behavior and mental processes. Interdisciplinary evidence will be explored to evaluate the presence of evolved psychological adaptations that characterize human nature. Applications of the evolutionary perspective will be explored in the context of many subfields within psychology, such as learning, memory, cognitive processing, development, personality, social behavior, disorders and more. In line with the Inspire theme, students will engage in coursework designed to explore the practical uses of evolutionary thought in understanding and addressing social problems.


THRS 110: Exploring Religious Meaning

TLC Faculty: Dr. Joel Gruber
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Throughout history, peoples of all cultures have attempted to understand why being human can be ecstatic and joyous, but can also seem meaningless and unjust. In order to do so, they have created belief systems, narrated myths, performed rituals, and formed "religious" communities to inspire, create meaning, and bring order to their lives. This course is a study of the various ways in which multiple religious traditions, including--but not limited to--Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam have engaged, defined, and redefined religious meaning, typically by privileging the "sacred" over the "mundane." The course is also a comparative endeavor designed so that we, as a class, can learn from and engage with these traditions, as well as from one another. While analyzing a host of religious traditions, avoiding the impulse to simplify, idealize, and/or vilify the views of others, we will apply socio-religious theory to re-examine our own definitions of "truth" and "the meaningful."


THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

The study of world religions allows us to understand the traditions and world views of cultures and societies different from our own. The course will begin with an exploration of what religion is: how it is formed and studied. The course will look at major religious traditions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions - Taoism and Confucianism. Each of these will be looked at in light of their history, worldview, understanding of the human condition, understanding of life and death, institutions and rituals, ethical expression and modern practice. Students will take part in field visits to places of worship around San Diego. On these visits students will speak with members of the worship community about the ways in which they are engaged in the local community and its needs and concerns.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introductory survey designed to prepare students for upper diviaion courses in Christian theology. Topics may include the scriptures, history of the Church and/or theology, the nature of theological discourse, introduction to theological terms and definitions, and examination of select topics or issues in theology. Emphasis will be placed on the constitutive dimensions and characteristics of the Roman Catholic tradition.

COMM 265: Introduction to Research

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jonathan Bowman
Core Area: Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 3 units

An introduction to communication research methodologies. Students are exposed to the prevailing paradigms of qualitative and quantitative research. The interpretive, descriptive, and explanatory foundations of research methodologies will be examined. Ethical principles governing the process of research will also be explored.


ENGL 304W: Advanced Composition

TLC Faculty: Prof. Lisa Smith
Core Area: Advanced Writing Competency | 3 units

In this course students will read autobiography and memoir in order to explore the way writers contextualize the self in the larger frameworks of family, community, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, nationality, historical moment, etc. By doing this students will consider the ways the self is shaped by these circles of influence and how through writing we see how we express these many faceted selves and connect with others.


ENGL 358: Staging America

TLC Faculty: Dr. Cynthia Caywood
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

The course examines how the idea of America and what it means to be American has been staged in our theatres. We will examine plays about both American dream and the American nightmare and considering their political and cultural contexts. We will also study the elements of drama to understand them generically and as performances. The class will see several productions, on film and, if possible, live, thus taking advantage of San Diego’s rich theatre community. Texts might include August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992; David Henry Hwang, Yellowface; Stephen Sondheim, Assassins; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Lin Manuel Miranda, In the Heights; Lynn Nottage, Sweat.


ENGL 358: Contemporary Ethnic Dystopia

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our scores for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin's The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee's On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany's Trouble on Triton, and Omar El Akkad's American War. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera's Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron's Children of Men.


ENGL 363: Pronouns and Participatory Reading

TLC Faculty: Dr. Atreyee Phukan
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Engaging with issues of diversity and social justice in a global context, this course examines literature and other cultural forms and media from various geographic regions, including Africa, South Asia, the Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Caribbean.


HIST 115: History of the Cold War

TLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Gonzalez
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry & Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This class will fulfill the Historical Inquiry/Critical Thinking and Information Literacy criterion for USD’s academic core. To that end, the class will examine the Cold War and its impact on American culture. We will open the class by discussing the origins of Soviet authoritarianism and then examine the differences between capitalism and communism. Next, we focus on the United States and ask how Americans prepared for the struggle against the Soviet Union. The class will then cover American foreign policy and examine how the Cold War influenced domestic issues in the United States. The class will close by discussing the nuclear arms race and show how the struggle to deploy atomic weapons changed the Soviet Union and the United States. The class will be challenging, but fun, and students will be expected to master the material.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

The great flourishing of arts and culture in Italy during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance is called Humanism. This movement, as the name suggests, redefined the concept of the human being and his or her place within the context of the familial, civic, and even global community. Every affirmation of the human being’s beauty, dignity, and goodness, however, also introduced infinite questions: What are the responsibilities and rights of individuals in society? What are the causes and effects of misrule? What are proper church-state relations? Students will investigate these questions, as well as ask others: Did Humanism truly exalt all humankind? Was the Renaissance a time of improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? How do our answers to these question reshape our perceptions of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance? In this course, students will examine the unique role of Humanism within the development of Western civilization, as well as challenge the very concepts of “civilization” and “progress” by considering the new literary, spiritual, and human values that emerged during the Italian Renaissance through differing lenses. This course is taught in English and all texts will be read in English translation.


POLS 371: American Foreign Policy

TLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the challenges and opportunities facing American foreign policy in the 21st century. Students examine the historical legacy and internal and external constraints on foreign policy decision making. Students also study theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations and discuss their relevance to an empirical analysis of American foreign policy.


PSYC 346: Evolutionary Psychology

TLC Faculty: Dr. Rebekah Wanic
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

The goal of this course is to examine and evaluate the evolutionary perspective as it relates to the study of behavior and mental processes. Interdisciplinary evidence will be explored to evaluate the presence of evolved psychological adaptations that characterize human nature. Applications of the evolutionary perspective will be explored in the context of many subfields within psychology, such as learning, memory, cognitive processing, development, personality, social behavior, disorders and more. In line with the Inspire theme, students will engage in coursework designed to explore the practical uses of evolutionary thought in understanding and addressing social problems.


THRS 110: Exploring Religious Meaning

TLC Faculty: Dr. Joel Gruber
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Throughout history, peoples of all cultures have attempted to understand why being human can be ecstatic and joyous, but can also seem meaningless and unjust. In order to do so, they have created belief systems, narrated myths, performed rituals, and formed "religious" communities to inspire, create meaning, and bring order to their lives. This course is a study of the various ways in which multiple religious traditions, including--but not limited to--Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam have engaged, defined, and redefined religious meaning, typically by privileging the "sacred" over the "mundane." The course is also a comparative endeavor designed so that we, as a class, can learn from and engage with these traditions, as well as from one another. While analyzing a host of religious traditions, avoiding the impulse to simplify, idealize, and/or vilify the views of others, we will apply socio-religious theory to re-examine our own definitions of "truth" and "the meaningful."


THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

The study of world religions allows us to understand the traditions and world views of cultures and societies different from our own. The course will begin with an exploration of what religion is: how it is formed and studied. The course will look at major religious traditions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions - Taoism and Confucianism. Each of these will be looked at in light of their history, worldview, understanding of the human condition, understanding of life and death, institutions and rituals, ethical expression and modern practice. Students will take part in field visits to places of worship around San Diego. On these visits students will speak with members of the worship community about the ways in which they are engaged in the local community and its needs and concerns.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introductory survey designed to prepare students for upper diviaion courses in Christian theology. Topics may include the scriptures, history of the Church and/or theology, the nature of theological discourse, introduction to theological terms and definitions, and examination of select topics or issues in theology. Emphasis will be placed on the constitutive dimensions and characteristics of the Roman Catholic tradition.