Courses Linked to the Engage TLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

 

THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

The study of world religions allows us to understand the traditions and world views of cultures and societies different from our own. The course will begin with an exploration of what religion is: how it is formed and studied. The course will look at major religious traditions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions - Taoism and Confucianism. Each of these will be looked at in light of their history, worldview, understanding of the human condition, understanding of life and death, institutions and rituals, ethical expression and modern practice. Students will take part in field visits to places of worship around San Diego. On these visits students will speak with members of the worship community about the ways in which they are engaged in the local community and its needs and concerns.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

Italian Renaissance thinkers, known as Humanists, redefined the role of the human being and his or her place within the context of the family, the city, the world, and even the universe. In this course, students will examine canonical writers (Dante, Machiavelli) as well as those who were not granted full access to participation in civic life (a middle-class widow, a Venetian courtesan). Was Humanism truly an exaltation of all humans? Was the Renaissance marked by improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? In this course, students will consider these and other questions that challenge the notions of “progress” and “civilization” during this time period.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is evil? What is good? Does human life have meaning? How does Christianity reconcile the reality of suffering with its faith in a God who is good? What are the social, ecological, and cosmic implications of these questions? This course will engage these and other topics from the perspective of the Christian Theological tradition, with emphasis on Roman Catholicism. Students will learn theological terms, definitions, and methods, including methods for interpreting the Bible and the Catholic Tradition.


POLS 170: International Relations Enters the Twilight Zone: Global Challenges and Resurgent Nationalism

TLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

Do you see yourself as a global citizen or a citizen of a country? Do our civic obligations stop at our borders? Can powerful countries unilaterally solve the many global challenges that confront us--nuclear proliferation, terrorism, organized crime, drug-trafficking, human trafficking, refugee and migrant flows, resource scarcity, and climate change, or do we need multilateral institutions, such as NATO or the United Nations? Is globalization exacerbating economic inequalities within and between countries? How do countries deal with the traditional concerns of war, peace, and diplomacy? In sum, we will address the life and death challenges and social and economic complexities of our political world.


ARCH 101: Intro to Architecture

TLC Faculty: Dr. Juliana Maxim
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 4 units

The purpose of this course is to offer, to any student, an introduction to the basic steps of design as it is done in architecture. For that purpose, the studio explores the skills of drawing, sketching, and model building, and introduces a full range of architectural ideas related to notions of form and space. The studio familiarizes students with the design process, teaches them how how to communicate ideas in visually effective ways, and how to develop a logic for making design decisions. 

The last part of the semester is dedicated to building student projects at full scale (design/built). The studio culminates in a collective exhibition.


ENGL 226: The Philosophy and Literature of Love

TLC Faculty: Dr. Malachi Black
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

As much an idea as it is an emotion, love has long been one of western civilization’s central preoccupations. But what is love, and what does it mean? From the earliest philosophers to the latest scientists and a multitude of writers in between, human beings have indefatigably sought to measure, define, taxonomy, and analyze the powerful if seemingly indescribable force of love. In this course, we will both evaluate and contribute to that preexisting discourse. In light of the highly interdisciplinary nature of our endeavor, we will accomplish a variety of distinct but correlated objectives. While this is in part a writing class, we will also encounter, interrogate, and analyze competing views of love through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, psychology, physiology, and sociobiology. Along the way, we will crystallize and articulate the origins and evolution of notions of love from Plato’s Greece to contemporary America; internalize, critique, and appraise the chief love-related contributions of Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern societies; and, complementarily, generate original (but not necessarily unprecedented) perspectives on the nature, significance, and substance of love through creative dialogues, stories and/or poems, and a final essay or “treatise.”


THRS 110: Exploring Religious Meaning

TLC Faculty: Dr. Louis Komjathy
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines major issues, important topics and themes, as well as representative concerns from various religious traditions. In contrast to THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions, which emphasizes a traditions-based approach, this course introduces students to the academic study of religion through a topical and thematic approach. In the process, students will gain not only basic literacy concerning religious traditions and phenomena deemed “religious,” but also understanding of interpretative issues in the study of religion. This class thus contextualizes religious activities within the larger contours of human history and relevant issues from comparative religious studies. It also serves as an introduction to Religious Studies as an interdisciplinary academic field and to the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego.


ENGL 358: Staging America

TLC Faculty: Dr. Cynthia Caywood
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

“Staging America” examines how the American theatre has staged the idea of America and what it means to be American. We will examine plays about both the American dream and the American nightmare and consider their political and cultural contexts. We will also study the elements of drama, including staging, in order to understand plays both generically and in performance. We will see several productions on film and, when possible live, thus taking advantage of San Diego’s rich theatre community. Texts might include August Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles 1992; David Henry Hwang, Chinglish; Stephen Sondheim, Assassins; Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman; Rogers and Hammerstein, Oklahoma; Josefina Lopez, Real Women Have Curves;and Anne Washburn, Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

TLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.

THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

The study of world religions allows us to understand the traditions and world views of cultures and societies different from our own. The course will begin with an exploration of what religion is: how it is formed and studied. The course will look at major religious traditions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions - Taoism and Confucianism. Each of these will be looked at in light of their history, worldview, understanding of the human condition, understanding of life and death, institutions and rituals, ethical expression and modern practice. Students will take part in field visits to places of worship around San Diego. On these visits students will speak with members of the worship community about the ways in which they are engaged in the local community and its needs and concerns.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

Italian Renaissance thinkers, known as Humanists, redefined the role of the human being and his or her place within the context of the family, the city, the world, and even the universe. In this course, students will examine canonical writers (Dante, Machiavelli) as well as those who were not granted full access to participation in civic life (a middle-class widow, a Venetian courtesan). Was Humanism truly an exaltation of all humans? Was the Renaissance marked by improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? In this course, students will consider these and other questions that challenge the notions of “progress” and “civilization” during this time period.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is evil? What is good? Does human life have meaning? How does Christianity reconcile the reality of suffering with its faith in a God who is good? What are the social, ecological, and cosmic implications of these questions? This course will engage these and other topics from the perspective of the Christian Theological tradition, with emphasis on Roman Catholicism. Students will learn theological terms, definitions, and methods, including methods for interpreting the Bible and the Catholic Tradition.


ARCH 221: Architecture and Theory Since 1945

TLC Faculty: Dr. Juliana Maxim
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

ARCHITECTURE AND THEORY SINCE 1945 is a synoptic view of practices and debates in contemporary architecture. In addition to foundational readings in architectural history and theory, this course examines design projects by some of the most influential architects of the second half of the 20th century, and the ways in which the production of spaces, buildings, and cities intersects with issues of social and economic justice, as well as with visions of a good society.