Courses Linked to the Innovate LLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

THRS 114: Art, Creativity, and the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist? Would it matter one way or the other? What does it mean to be human? Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice? These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence. This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course offers an introduction to the examination of media and media literacy. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of radio, television, and cable are addressed. Fulfills a core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.


ARTV 105: Introduction to Sculpture

LLC Faculty: Allison Wiese, M.F.A.
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

An introductory studio art course exploring the artistic media and methods (both very traditional and quite experimental!) used to communicate in contemporary sculpture. Students will investigate sculptural form as meaning-making through studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings and discussions. The course gives students an understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials and strategies for art making, and helps them begin to identify the vocabularies and concerns that inform their own work.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Terry Bird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. The laboratory will include inquiry into the structure and function of DNA, and testing hypotheses of evolution and phylogeny.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Richard Gonzalez
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Geoffrey Morse
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


ARCH 101: Introduction to Architecture Studio

LLC Faculty: Dr. Daniel López-Pérez
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Have you ever wondered about the properties that constitute an architectural project and its relationship to the environment? What physical, social and spatial forces give it shape? How can these be explored through the production of physical models, drawings, annotations, and computer aided design? Open to any student, this course offers an introduction to architectural design and the fundamentals of the discipline. Through a series of hands-on individual and collective assignments, students explore the creative processes of drawing, sketching, and model building, in an exciting and highly interactive studio setting. Studio work, desk critiques, tutorials, lectures and presentations will serve as the backdrop from which to discuss a wide range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline.


POLS 220: Voting

LLC Faculty: Dr. Casey Dominguez
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This is a special topics course on voting and voter behavior that is designed for students with a strong background in high school level American politics and government. Students will study how and why people vote and will engage in community service activities to register voters in the midterm election.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Andrew Narwold
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

How does technology and international trade contribute to the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers? How does rent control and minimum wage impact society? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


THRS 119: Christianity and its Practice

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of Christianities in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy--from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don't all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway?


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

In this course—which is first-and-foremost about writing and the writing process—we will consider ways to responsibly cultivate a culture of openness. We will center our discussions around the concepts of citizenship, civic engagement, and belonging in the U.S. by asking questions such as: What forces foster a sense of belonging within democratic institutions? What forces impede such belonging? How can we best create civic relationships with one another that encourage dissent, as well as reciprocity and accountability?

Students in FYW-150 will search for others’ complicated answers to these questions by reading fiction, poetry, memoir, scholarly articles, and journalism. They will write in multiple genres to locate their own complex answers to these questions. They will put their ideas into conversation with others and test their own arguments against those with whom they disagree. Throughout this semester, students will share their writing with classmates and become attentive, active public audience members for one another. They will analyze their own stories, locate topics that inspire them to take part in larger public conversations, conduct secondary research, and produce texts that are written specific rhetorical situations.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Joel Alejandro Mejia
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today’s world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


MATH 112: Folding Explorations in Mathematics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Perla Myers
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving | 3 units

In recent years, new techniques in folding have led to surprising innovations in areas that include medicine, robotics, architecture, engineering and science. Some of these advances were possible through the power of mathematics, and, in turn, the connections between mathematical thinking and folding have led to rich mathematical results. In this highly interactive course we will delve into some of the greatest ideas of humankind in the realm of mathematics, ancient and evolving, and will use folding, creativity and imagination to inspire mathematical explorations that will lead to some beautiful and intriguing ideas. You will be challenged to expand your mind and discover the power of mathematical thinking in your life.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 560 or greater, or an ACT score of 23 or greater, to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

In this introduction to communication, we will explore how communication shapes your identity, (non)verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, group decision making, and conflict negotiation. This course surveys the breadth of best practices across the discipline of communication including public speaking. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication.


MATH 150: Calculus 1 (with Applications to the Life Sciences)

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jennifer Prairie
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving | 4 unit class w/ lab

This course will introduce students to the fundamental notions of calculus, including analytic geometry, and differential and integral calculus, but an interdisciplinary perspective will be used to explore the connections between calculus and the life sciences. Students will learn to apply concepts from calculus to solve problems with relevance to biology and environmental science. Students will also complete a final project, in which they will work in teams to apply concepts from the course to a biological or environmental question of their choice.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater, or an ACT score of 27 or greater, to qualify for this LLC course.


HIST 130: East Asia in Transformation

LLC Faculty: Dr. Yi Sun
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

To be a responsible global citizen in the 21st century, it is imperative to comprehend the historical transformations of East Asia. This class helps students develop a sophisticated understanding of the social, cultural, economic and political changes in East Asian countries since the 19th century. It will examine their shared cultural heritage and differing paths of development. Major topics include China’s journey from a semi-colony to a global power, Japan’s growth from its rice paddies to modern metropolises, and Korea’s change from one “Hermit Kingdom” to two adversaries ensnared in an unfolding nuclear crisis. The class also dissects the social and environmental costs of modernization as well as the geopolitical significance of the East Asian experience.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry I

LLC Faculty: Dr. David DeHaan
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Our world is made out of little bits called atoms and molecules. How do we know this? How is this knowledge advantageous for solving global problems? In this introductory course you will work with other students, with the instructor as your guide, to interpret data, build theories, make and test predictions, and cement your understanding of a variety of foundational topics that will help you in many fields of science and medicine. The spatial reasoning and group problem solving skills you will pick up in this course will prove tremendously useful to you no matter what your career.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed the Level 1 Math Placement Exam with a score of P, or the Level 2 Math Placement Exam M-130 with a score of P, to qualify for this course.

THRS 114: Art, Creativity, and the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist? Would it matter one way or the other? What does it mean to be human? Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice? These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence. This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course offers an introduction to the examination of media and media literacy. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of radio, television, and cable are addressed. Fulfills a core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.


ARTV 105: Introduction to Sculpture

LLC Faculty: Allison Wiese, M.F.A.
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

An introductory studio art course exploring the artistic media and methods (both very traditional and quite experimental!) used to communicate in contemporary sculpture. Students will investigate sculptural form as meaning-making through studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings and discussions. The course gives students an understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials and strategies for art making, and helps them begin to identify the vocabularies and concerns that inform their own work.


ARCH 101: Introduction to Architecture Studio

LLC Faculty: Dr. Daniel López-Pérez
Core: Artistic Inquiry | 4 units

Have you ever wondered about the properties that constitute an architectural project and its relationship to the environment? What physical, social and spatial forces give it shape? How can these be explored through the production of physical models, drawings, annotations, and computer aided design? Open to any student, this course offers an introduction to architectural design and the fundamentals of the discipline. Through a series of hands-on individual and collective assignments, students explore the creative processes of drawing, sketching, and model building, in an exciting and highly interactive studio setting. Studio work, desk critiques, tutorials, lectures and presentations will serve as the backdrop from which to discuss a wide range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline.


THRS 119: Christianity and its Practice

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of Christianities in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy--from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don't all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway?


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

In this course—which is first-and-foremost about writing and the writing process—we will consider ways to responsibly cultivate a culture of openness. We will center our discussions around the concepts of citizenship, civic engagement, and belonging in the U.S. by asking questions such as: What forces foster a sense of belonging within democratic institutions? What forces impede such belonging? How can we best create civic relationships with one another that encourage dissent, as well as reciprocity and accountability?

Students in FYW-150 will search for others’ complicated answers to these questions by reading fiction, poetry, memoir, scholarly articles, and journalism. They will write in multiple genres to locate their own complex answers to these questions. They will put their ideas into conversation with others and test their own arguments against those with whom they disagree. Throughout this semester, students will share their writing with classmates and become attentive, active public audience members for one another. They will analyze their own stories, locate topics that inspire them to take part in larger public conversations, conduct secondary research, and produce texts that are written specific rhetorical situations.


MATH 112: Folding Explorations in Mathematics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Perla Myers
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving | 3 unit class w/ lab

In recent years, new techniques in folding have led to surprising innovations in areas that include medicine, robotics, architecture, engineering and science. Some of these advances were possible through the power of mathematics, and, in turn, the connections between mathematical thinking and folding have led to rich mathematical results. In this highly interactive course we will delve into some of the greatest ideas of humankind in the realm of mathematics, ancient and evolving, and will use folding, creativity and imagination to inspire mathematical explorations that will lead to some beautiful and intriguing ideas. You will be challenged to expand your mind and discover the power of mathematical thinking in your life.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 560 or greater, or an ACT score of 23 or greater, to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

In this introduction to communication, we will explore how communication shapes your identity, (non)verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, group decision making, and conflict negotiation. This course surveys the breadth of best practices across the discipline of communication including public speaking. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication.


HIST 130: East Asia in Transformation

LLC Faculty: Dr. Yi Sun
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

To be a responsible global citizen in the 21st century, it is imperative to comprehend the historical transformations of East Asia. This class helps students develop a sophisticated understanding of the social, cultural, economic and political changes in East Asian countries since the 19th century. It will examine their shared cultural heritage and differing paths of development. Major topics include China’s journey from a semi-colony to a global power, Japan’s growth from its rice paddies to modern metropolises, and Korea’s change from one “Hermit Kingdom” to two adversaries ensnared in an unfolding nuclear crisis. The class also dissects the social and environmental costs of modernization as well as the geopolitical significance of the East Asian experience.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry I

LLC Faculty: Dr. David DeHaan
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Our world is made out of little bits called atoms and molecules. How do we know this? How is this knowledge advantageous for solving global problems? In this introductory course you will work with other students, with the instructor as your guide, to interpret data, build theories, make and test predictions, and cement your understanding of a variety of foundational topics that will help you in many fields of science and medicine. The spatial reasoning and group problem solving skills you will pick up in this course will prove tremendously useful to you no matter what your career.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed the Level 1 Math Placement Exam with a score of P, or the Level 2 Math Placement Exam M-130 with a score of P, to qualify for this course.