Courses Linked to the Innovate LLC

2017-2018

THRS 114: Art, Creativity and the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry  3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist?  Would it matter one way or the other?  What does it mean to be human?  Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice?  These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence.  This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

This course offers an introduction to the examination of media and media literacy. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of radio, television, and cable are addressed. Fulfills a core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.


ARTV 105: Introduction to Sculpture

LLC Faculty: Dr. Allison Wiese
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry  3 units

An introductory studio course exploring the artistic media and methods (both very traditional and quite experimental!) used to communicate in contemporary sculpture. Students will investigate sculptural form as meaning-making through studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings and discussions. The course gives students an understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials and strategies for art making, and helps them begin to identify the vocabularies and concerns that inform their own work. 


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics & Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Richard Gonzalez
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment.  Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 570 or greater, an ACT Math score of 25 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Terry Bird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. The laboratory will include inquiry into the structure and function of DNA, and testing hypotheses of evolution and phylogeny.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 570 or greater, an ACT Math score of 25 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Geoffrey Morse
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 570 or greater, an ACT Math score of 25 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice  3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary and intersectional study of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in the U.S. We examine the histories of American Indians, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans; explore citizenship, conflict, community, and cultural formations; and analyze the role and function of race in U.S. society.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry

LLC Faculty: Dr. David DeHaan
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

Our world is made out of little bits called atoms and molecules.  How do we know this?  How is this knowledge advantageous for solving global problems?  In this introductory course you will work with other students, with the instructor as your guide, to interpret data, build theories, make and test predictions, and cement your understanding of a variety of foundational topics that will help you in many fields of science and medicine.  The spatial reasoning and group problem solving skills you will pick up in this course will prove tremendously useful to you no matter what your career.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 530 or greater, an ACT Math score of 22 or greater, or pass the Level 1 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Frank Jacobitz
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical and industrial). Introduction to engineering software tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Greg Prieto
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry and Diversity, Inclusion & Social Justice core 3 units

Sociology is the study of society and social life, including the institutions, groups, individuals, and interactions that make it up.  In sociological tradition, this course will emphasize a “critical” approach to the study of society and social relations.  We will examine the way that social phenomena such as race, class, gender, and sexuality shape social life.  To accomplish this objective, we will study various social issues that range from heat waves and homelessness to sexual assault and undocumented immigration to better understand the ways broader social and historical patterns that we often do not perceive, nevertheless influence our everyday lives.  


POLS 120: Introduction to American Politics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Casey Dominguez
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry and Diversity, Inclusion & Social Justice core  3 units

America's diversity makes it vibrant. However, democracy requires us to both tolerate and compromise with people who have completely different cultures, values and beliefs about the role of government. So just how can a diverse country like ours ever come to consensus about the common good? And when we try to come together to work toward a common good, what rules govern that discussion? How do those rules structure the behavior of individuals, parties, interest groups, and institutions? Do you like the outcomes of the political system? Do you know how they come about? How to change them?


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Andrew Narwold
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

How does technology and international trade contribute to the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers? How does rent control and minimum wage impact society? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Anne Koenig
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

Psychology is the scientific study of human behavior, attempting to answer the question of why we think and act the way we do. In this course you will learn what a variety of subfields have to say about this question, including biological psychology, sensation and perception, human development, learning, memory, personality, social psychology, psychopathology, and psychological treatments for disorders. These topics will be approached with an emphasis on scientific methods, critical thinking about popular myths, and the application of these concepts to everyday life. This course is the starting point for both the psychology and behavioral neuroscience majors.


ENGL 226: Romanticism and Revolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ivan Ortiz
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  3 units

Percy Shelley proclaimed in his electric Defense of Poetry (1820) that the poet is the "unacknowledged legislator of the world." He was right. Poets, writers, and artists in the Romantic period (1780-1840) burst onto the political scene in an unprecedented way. Literature in this era became more political than ever before. This course introduces students to Romanticism-- "the age of revolution"--through an engagement with poems, plays, novels, essays, and political manifestos. We will consider literature's impact on a series of social revolutions: political institutions, the world of manners, poetry and art, the slave trade, women's rights, industrialization, and urbanization.


ENGL 230: Transnational Asian American Literature

LLC Faculty: Dr. Koonyong Kim
Core Area: Literary Inquiry and Diversity, Inclusion & Social Justice core 3 units

Facilitated by digital technology, social media, and cultural exchange across national borders, globalization is now radically reshaping our daily life. In this course we will reflect on contemporary global culture by studying Asian American literature through the lenses of Asian food, film, drama, manga, and memoir, among others. In doing so, we will also explore multicultural resources and events San Diego has to offer. Class activities include visiting local Asian restaurants, attending the San Diego Asian Film Festival, and participating in a tea ceremony and/or a meditation class in the Japanese Friendship Garden. 


THRS 119: Christianity: Past, Present, Future

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry  3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of “Christianities”—in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy—from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don’t all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway? 


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Area: First Year Writing Core  3 units

In this course—which is first-and-foremost about writing and the writing process—we will consider ways to responsibly cultivate a culture of openness.  We will center our discussions around the concepts of citizenship, civic engagement, and belonging in the U.S. by asking questions such as: What forces foster a sense of belonging within democratic institutions?  What forces impede such belonging? How can we best create civic relationships with one another that encourage dissent, as well as reciprocity and accountability?

Students in FYW 150 will search for others’ complicated answers to these questions by reading fiction, poetry, memoir, scholarly articles, and journalism. They will write in multiple genres to locate their own complex answers to these questions. They will put their ideas into conversation with others and test their own arguments against those with whom they disagree. Throughout this semester, students will share their writing with classmates and become attentive, active public audience members for one another.  They will analyze their own stories, locate topics that inspire them to take part in larger public conversations, conduct secondary research, and produce texts that are written specific rhetorical situations.

THRS 114: Art, Creativity and the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry  3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist?  Would it matter one way or the other?  What does it mean to be human?  Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice?  These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence.  This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

This course offers an introduction to the examination of media and media literacy. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of radio, television, and cable are addressed. Fulfills a core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Inquiry 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary and intersectional study of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in the U.S. We examine the histories of American Indians, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans; explore citizenship, conflict, community, and cultural formations; and analyze the role and function of race in U.S. society.


SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Greg Prieto
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Inquiry 3 units

Sociology is the study of society and social life, including the institutions, groups, individuals, and interactions that make it up.  In sociological tradition, this course will emphasize a “critical” approach to the study of society and social relations.  We will examine the way that social phenomena such as race, class, gender, and sexuality shape social life.  To accomplish this objective, we will study various social issues that range from heat waves and homelessness to sexual assault and undocumented immigration to better understand the ways broader social and historical patterns that we often do not perceive, nevertheless influence our everyday lives.


CHEM 152: General Chemistry II

LLC Faculty: Dr. David DeHaan
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

Part 2 of a two semester lecture course which introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry. These principles, which include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, reactivity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, bonding, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and states of matter, will be used in and expanded upon in more advanced courses. Three lectures weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 530 or greater, an ACT Math score of 22 or greater, or pass the Level 1 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


POLS 120: Introduction to American Politics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Casey Dominguez
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Inquiry  3 units

America's diversity makes it vibrant. However, democracy requires us to both tolerate and compromise with people who have completely different cultures, values and beliefs about the role of government. So just how can a diverse country like ours ever come to consensus about the common good? And when we try to come together to work toward a common good, what rules govern that discussion? How do those rules structure the behavior of individuals, parties, interest groups, and institutions? Do you like the outcomes of the political system? Do you know how they come about? How to change them?


FYW 150: First Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Deborah Sundmacher
Core Area: Writing core  3 units

Description to come.


ENGL 226: Romanticism and Revolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ivan Ortiz
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  3 units

Percy Shelley proclaimed in his electric Defense of Poetry (1820) that the poet is the "unacknowledged legislator of the world." He was right. Poets, writers, and artists in the Romantic period (1780-1840) burst onto the political scene in an unprecedented way. Literature in this era became more political than ever before. This course introduces students to Romanticism-- "the age of revolution"--through an engagement with poems, plays, novels, essays, and political manifestos. We will consider literature's impact on a series of social revolutions: political institutions, the world of manners, poetry and art, the slave trade, women's rights, industrialization, and urbanization.


ENGL 236: Global Anime and Manga

LLC Faculty: Dr. Koonyong Kim
Core Area: Literary Inquiry and Domestic Diversity Inquiry 3 units

Description to come. 


THRS 119: Christianity: Past, Present, Future

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry  3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of "Christianities”in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovaha's Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don't all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway? 


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Area: First Year Writing Core  3 units

In this course—which is first-and-foremost about writing and the writing process—we will consider ways to responsibly cultivate a culture of openness.  We will center our discussions around the concepts of citizenship, civic engagement, and belonging in the U.S. by asking questions such as: What forces foster a sense of belonging within democratic institutions?  What forces impede such belonging? How can we best create civic relationships with one another that encourage dissent, as well as reciprocity and accountability?

Students in FYW 150 will search for others’ complicated answers to these questions by reading fiction, poetry, memoir, scholarly articles, and journalism. They will write in multiple genres to locate their own complex answers to these questions. They will put their ideas into conversation with others and test their own arguments against those with whom they disagree. Throughout this semester, students will share their writing with classmates and become attentive, active public audience members for one another.  They will analyze their own stories, locate topics that inspire them to take part in larger public conversations, conduct secondary research, and produce texts that are written specific rhetorical situations.