Courses Linked to the Illuminate Honors LLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

 

COMM 101H: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Diane Keeling
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 4 units

How does communication shape your identity, interpersonal relationships, or ability to work in groups? Would you like to learn skills that can prevent and navigate conflicts? How about about skills in public speaking? This course surveys best practices across the discipline of communication. In this course students will enhance their perception, listening, nonverbal communication, and presentation skills. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication, with particular emphasis on identity management.


CHEM 151H: General Chemistry I

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeremy Kua
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 4 units

What is matter and why does it matter? What is light and how does light illuminate the structure of matter, from the secrets of massive far-flung galaxies to the intricate arrangement of atoms within molecules? This first semester general chemistry course introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry and the role of light in learning about atoms, molecules, chemical reactivity and the periodic table. These are some of the topics that will be illuminated in this course.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed the Level 1 Math Placement Exam with a score of P, or the Level 2 Math Placement Exam M-130 with a score of P, to qualify for this course.


ENGR 101H: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susan Lord
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 4 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today's world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering, but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


PHIL 110H: Introduction to Philosophy

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Kelly
Core Area: Philosophical Inquiry | 4 units

In Philosophy 110, you'll apply the methods of philosophy to enduring questions: What kind of good is justice? How do the pleasant and the good relate? Is pleasure happiness? Does the existence of horrendous evil cause a problem for the claim that an all-powerful, supremely-good God exists? How can grappling with mortality shape the way one lives one’s life? What is maturity and enlightenment? In short, you’ll learn how to recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments, how to develop habits conducive towards thinking and writing clearly, and how to identify those philosophical questions relevant to living life well.


BIOL 242H: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Mayer
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 4 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. NO CHANGE: This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


SOCI 101H: Intro to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Greg Prieto
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 4 units

Sociology is the study of society and social life, including the institutions, groups, individuals, and interactions that make it up. We will examine phenomena such as race, class, gender, and sexuality as social categories. To accomplish this objective, we will study various social issues that range from heat waves and homelessness to sexual assault and undocumented immigration, to better understand the ways broader social and historical patterns that we often do not perceive, nevertheless influence our everyday lives. In sociological tradition, this course will emphasize a “critical” approach to the study of society and social relations, meaning we will interrogate our taken for granted assumptions and received wisdom in our exploration of the causes and consequences of social inequality.


POLS 170H: International Relations Enters the Twilight Zone: Global Challenges and Resurgent Nationalism

LLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 4 units

Do you see yourself as a global citizen or a citizen of a country? Do our civic obligations stop at our borders? Can powerful countries unilaterally solve the many global challenges that confront us--nuclear proliferation, terrorism, organized crime, drug-trafficking, human trafficking, refugee and migrant flows, resource scarcity, and climate change--or do we need multilateral institutions, such as NATO or the United Nations? Is globalization exacerbating economic inequalities within and between countries? How do countries deal with the traditional concerns of war, peace, and diplomacy? In sum, we will address the life and death challenges and social and economic complexities of our political world.

COMM 101H: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Diane Keeling
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 4 units

How does communication shape your identity, interpersonal relationships, or ability to work in groups? Would you like to learn skills that can prevent and navigate conflicts? How about about skills in public speaking? This course surveys best practices across the discipline of communication. In this course students will enhance their perception, listening, nonverbal communication, and presentation skills. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication, with particular emphasis on identity management.


PHIL 110H: Introduction to Philosophy

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Kelly
Core Area: Philosophical Inquiry | 4 units

In Philosophy 110, you'll apply the methods of philosophy to enduring questions: What kind of good is justice? How do the pleasant and the good relate? Is pleasure happiness? Does the existence of horrendous evil cause a problem for the claim that an all-powerful, supremely-good God exists? How can grappling with mortality shape the way one lives one’s life? What is maturity and enlightenment? In short, you’ll learn how to recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments, how to develop habits conducive towards thinking and writing clearly, and how to identify those philosophical questions relevant to living life well.


SOCI 101H: Intro to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Greg Prieto
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 4 units

Sociology is the study of society and social life, including the institutions, groups, individuals, and interactions that make it up. We will examine phenomena such as race, class, gender, and sexuality as social categories. To accomplish this objective, we will study various social issues that range from heat waves and homelessness to sexual assault and undocumented immigration, to better understand the ways broader social and historical patterns that we often do not perceive, nevertheless influence our everyday lives. In sociological tradition, this course will emphasize a “critical” approach to the study of society and social relations, meaning we will interrogate our taken for granted assumptions and received wisdom in our exploration of the causes and consequences of social inequality. 


ENG 226H: The Philosophy and Literature of Love

LLC Faculty: Dr. Malachi Black
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 4 units

As much an idea as it is an emotion, love has long been one of western civilization’s central preoccupations. But what is love, and what does it mean? From the earliest philosophers to the latest scientists and a multitude of writers in between, human beings have indefatigably sought to measure, define, taxonomy, and analyze the powerful if seemingly indescribable force of love. In this course, we will both evaluate and contribute to that preexisting discourse. In light of the highly interdisciplinary nature of our endeavor, we will accomplish a variety of distinct but correlated objectives. While this is in part a writing class, we will also encounter, interrogate, and analyze competing views of love through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, psychology, physiology, and sociobiology. Along the way, we will crystallize and articulate the origins and evolution of notions of love from Plato’s Greece to contemporary America; internalize, critique, and appraise the chief love-related contributions of Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern societies; and, complementarily, generate original (but not necessarily unprecedented) perspectives on the nature, significance, and substance of love through creative dialogues, stories and/or poems, and a final essay or “treatise.”


POLS 170H: International Relations Enters the Twilight Zone: Global Challenges and Resurgent Nationalism

LLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 4 units

Do you see yourself as a global citizen or a citizen of a country? Do our civic obligations stop at our borders? Can powerful countries unilaterally solve the many global challenges that confront us--nuclear proliferation, terrorism, organized crime, drug-trafficking, human trafficking, refugee and migrant flows, resource scarcity, and climate change--or do we need multilateral institutions, such as NATO or the United Nations? Is globalization exacerbating economic inequalities within and between countries? How do countries deal with the traditional concerns of war, peace, and diplomacy? In sum, we will address the life and death challenges and social and economic complexities of our political world.


FYW 150H: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Deborah Sundmacher, M.A.
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 4 units

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement for lower-division Written Communication. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Must be taken in first year.