Courses Linked to the Illuminate Honors LLC

2017-2018

 

COMM 101H: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Diane Keeling
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  4 units

Would you like to better understand your communication and how it shapes your identity, interpersonal relationships, ability to work in groups? Would you like to learn the skills to better prevent and navigate conflicts? How about become a better public speaker? This course surveys the breadth of best practices across the discipline of communication. In this course students will enhance their perception, listening, nonverbal communication, presentation skills. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication, with particular emphasis on identity management. 


 

BIOL 242H: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Mayer
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  4 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 570 or greater, an ACT Math score of 25 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


CHEM 151H: General Chemistry

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeremy Kua
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  4 units

What is matter and why does it matter? What is light and how does light illuminate the structure of matter, from the secrets of massive far-flung galaxies to the intricate arrangement of atoms within molecules? This first semester general chemistry course introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry and the role of light in learning about atoms, molecules, chemical reactivity and the periodic table. These are some of the topics that will be illuminated in this course. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 530 or greater, an ACT Math score of 22 or greater, or pass the Level 1 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGR 101H: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susan Lord
Core Area:Scientific and Technological Inquiry  4 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer?  Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems?  If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today’s world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.  

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


LANG 141H: Migration Through Cinema

LLC Faculty: Dr. Martin Repincenz
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  and Domestic Diversity Inquiry  4 units

This course will explore the representation of immigration in film, focusing on three broad sociohistorical contexts: the U.S. / Mexico border; 19th and early 20th century European migrations to America; and contemporary trans-Mediterranean migrations. We will use films and readings as a starting point to think about pressing issues such as: citizenship, national identity and belonging; the multilayered impact of borders, literal and metaphorical; negotiation with "native" and "host" cultures; and inter-generational conflict and cross-cultural identifications, among others. Similarly, we will also consider the diverse nature of migratory experiences, drawing special attention to intersecting identities such as race, gender, nation and class.


PHIL 110H: Introduction to Philosophy

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Kelly
Core Area: Philosophical Inquiry  4 units

In Philosophy 110, you'll be exposed to a broad range of philosophical questions, such as: Is the mind a separate thing from the brain? Do you in fact know the things you think you know? What is free-will and do humans have it? Does the existence of horrendous evil cause a problem for the claim that an all-powerful supremely-good God exists? Furthermore, you will be introduced to a philosophical skill. You'll learn how to recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments, how to develop habits conducive towards thinking and writing critically, and how to ask philosophical questions relevant to your own lives.


POLS 100H: Power and Justice

LLC Faculty: Dr. Del Dickson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  4 units

This course presents a survey of the core theories, concepts, and approaches of political science. Politics is how power is organized and used, so we will begin by seeking answers to two fundamental questions of politics: who rules, and why? We will read excerpts of classic political works, from Plato to Hannah Arendt, to explore competing theories of political power, including authoritarianism, democracy, anarchy, and libertarianism. We will then examine theories of political change-- including revolution, progressivism, and conservatism-- before concluding with a brief but interesting study of the relationship between law, politics, and justice.

COMM 101H: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Diane Keeling
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  4 units

Would you like to better understand your communication and how it shapes your identity, interpersonal relationships, ability to work in groups? Would you like to learn the skills to better prevent and navigate conflicts? How about become a better public speaker? This course surveys the breadth of best practices across the discipline of communication. In this course students will enhance their perception, listening, nonverbal communication, presentation skills. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, and public communication, with particular emphasis on identity management. 


ENG 226: Philosophy and Literature of Love

LLC Faculty: Dr. Malachi Black
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  4 units

As much an idea as it is an emotion, love has long been one of western civilization’s central preoccupations.  But what is love, and what does it mean?  From the earliest philosophers to the latest scientists and a multitude of writers in between, human beings have indefatigably sought to measure, define, taxonomy, and analyze the powerful if seemingly indescribable force of love.  In this course, we will both evaluate and contribute to that preexisting discourse.  In light of the highly interdisciplinary nature of our endeavor, we will accomplish a variety of distinct but correlated objectives.  While this is in part a writing class, we will also encounter, interrogate, and analyze competing views of love through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, psychology, physiology, and sociobiology.  Along the way, we will crystallize and articulate the origins and evolution of notions of love from Plato’s Greece to contemporary America; internalize, critique, and appraise the chief love-related contributions of Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern societies; and, complementarily, generate original (but not necessarily unprecedented) perspectives on the nature, significance, and substance of love through creative dialogues, stories and/or poems, and a final essay or “treatise.”


LANG 141H: Migration Through Cinema

LLC Faculty: Dr. Martin Repincenz
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  and Domestic Diversity Inquiry 4 units

This course will explore the representation of immigration in film, focusing on three broad sociohistorical contexts: the U.S. / Mexico border; 19th and early 20th century European migrations to America; and contemporary trans-Mediterranean migrations. We will use films and readings as a starting point to think about pressing issues such as: citizenship, national identity and belonging; the multilayered impact of borders, literal and metaphorical; negotiation with "native" and "host" cultures; and inter-generational conflict and cross-cultural identifications, among others. Similarly, we will also consider the diverse nature of migratory experiences, drawing special attention to intersecting identities such as race, gender, nation and class.


PHIL 110H: Introduction to Philosophy

LLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Kelly
Core Area: Philosophical Inquiry  4 units

In Philosophy 110, you'll be exposed to a broad range of philosophical questions, such as: Is the mind a separate thing from the brain? Do you in fact know the things you think you know? What is free-will and do humans have it? Does the existence of horrendous evil cause a problem for the claim that an all-powerful supremely-good God exists? Furthermore, you will be introduced to a philosophical skill. You'll learn how to recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments, how to develop habits conducive towards thinking and writing critically, and how to ask philosophical questions relevant to your own lives.


POLS 100H: Power and Justice

LLC Faculty: Dr. Del Dickson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  4 units

This course presents a survey of the core theories, concepts, and approaches of political science. Politics is how power is organized and used, so we will begin by seeking answers to two fundamental questions of politics: who rules, and why? We will read excerpts of classic political works, from Plato to Hannah Arendt, to explore competing theories of political power, including authoritarianism, democracy, anarchy, and libertarianism. We will then examine theories of political change-- including revolution, progressivism, and conservatism-- before concluding with a brief but interesting study of the relationship between law, politics, and justice.

 

 


THRS: World Religions

LLC Faculty: Lark Diaz
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry  3 units

The study of world religions allows us to understand the traditions and world views of cultures
and societies different from our own. The course will begin with an exploration of what religion
is: how it is formed and studied. The course will look at major religious traditions including
Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions - Taoism and
Confucianism. Each of these will be looked at in light of their history, world view, understanding
of the human condition, understanding of life and death, institutions and rituals, ethical
expression and modern practice. Students will take part in field visits to places of worship
around San Diego. On these visits students will speak with members of the worship community
about the ways in which they are engaged in the local community and its needs and concerns.