Courses Linked to the Cultivate LLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Drew Talley
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 4 unit class w/ lab

How does a dust storm in Africa affect a sloth in South America? Why is there kelp in San Diego, but mangroves in Florida? This class will explain by providing you with an introduction to fundamental principles of ecology (e.g., how do populations grow? Why are mice and ants in fierce competition with each other?), as well as who is who in the tree of life, and how all of these factors interact to create the world we live in. This is a required course for all EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alyson Ma
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered why things happen the way they do? What is the motivation for offering grants to college students? How does the iPhone contribute to the U.S. trade deficit? Why do firms offer new variations of their existing products? How does innovation lead to economic growth? Should price discrimination be allowed?

This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, and an introduction to market structure. We will use the economic framework to interpret real world events and economic policies. The goal of this course is to prepare you to critically judge complex issues facing the world economy.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Imane Khalil
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical and industrial). Introduction to engineering software tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. Eric Pierson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This is an introductory survey course focused on the development and operations of the media in the United States and abroad. The course will focus on the intersection of media with political, economic and social systems. The role of the mass media industries in the creation and support of ideology will also be one of the focal points in the class. Issues of class, race and gender have all been impacted by mass media, and one of the goals of the course is an evaluation of that impact at various historical moments. Upon completion of the course, you will possess the framework for assessing the impact of media in your lives, as well as the lives of others.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Bradley Melekian, M.F.A.
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What role has the natural world traditionally played in identity formation (i.e. in the case of Thoreau)? What states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh and uncaring natural environment force contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Robyn Davidson's Tracks.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

In Introduction to Mechanics you will learn the approaches and methods physicists use to uncover the workings of our universe. Physicists strive to model a wide range of phenomena that span enormous time and length scales by finding general relationships, patterns and symmetries. In this course, we will primarily study the quantitative relationships between motion, forces and energy which can describe how bacteria propel themselves to planetary motion. We will also investigate oscillatory motion to describe waves and vibrations. As we work through these topics, you will gain extensive practice and discover strategies for quantitatively solving complex problems.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, M.A.
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement for lower-division Written Communication. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Must be taken in first year.


COMP 110: Computational Problem Solving

LLC Faculty: Dr. John Glick
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3.5 unit class w/ lab

Computer software is everywhere. It is behind the scenes of your favorite app, computer game, and website. It helps to control your car and every appliance you own. Companies use software to design, build and sell their products. And the list goes on and on. Computer Science is the study of the theory and practice of software development, and this course is an introduction to computer science - and in particular to the principles of computer programming. You will learn basic programming constructs, such as conditional and iteration statements, by solving problems from different application areas. This is the first course taken by students who wish to major in computer science, but it also is an excellent option for students with interests in business, science, engineering, or the arts.


PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Patricia Kowalski
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introduction to the science of psychology—its origins as the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, its research methodology, and a sampling of its many domains of investigation. Topics include the biological basis of behavior, how we perceive the natural world, how we learn and remember (and why we don’t), and how principles of psychological science can be applied to solving practical problems. We will apply the tools of critical and scientific thinking ​to help us understand ​the nature of misconceptions among the public. We will also discuss cognitive and motivational reasons for why ​some people do ​not change their beliefs once provided with evidence, and we will explore how we can make the world around us a healthier place to live.

EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Drew Talley
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 4 unit class w/ lab

How does a dust storm in Africa affect a sloth in South America? Why is there kelp in San Diego, but mangroves in Florida? This class will explain by providing you with an introduction to fundamental principles of ecology (e.g., how do populations grow? Why are mice and ants in fierce competition with each other?), as well as who is who in the tree of life, and how all of these factors interact to create the world we live in. This is a required course for all EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. Eric Pierson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This is an introductory survey course focused on the development and operations of the media in the United States and abroad. The course will focus on the intersection of media with political, economic and social systems. The role of the mass media industries in the creation and support of ideology will also be one of the focal points in the class. Issues of class, race and gender have all been impacted by mass media, and one of the goals of the course is an evaluation of that impact at various historical moments. Upon completion of the course, you will possess the framework for assessing the impact of media in your lives, as well as the lives of others.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Bradley Melekian, M.F.A.
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What role has the natural world traditionally played in identity formation (i.e. in the case of Thoreau)? What states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh and uncaring natural environment force contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Robyn Davidson's Tracks.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

In Introduction to Mechanics you will learn the approaches and methods physicists use to uncover the workings of our universe. Physicists strive to model a wide range of phenomena that span enormous time and length scales by finding general relationships, patterns and symmetries. In this course, we will primarily study the quantitative relationships between motion, forces and energy which can describe how bacteria propel themselves to planetary motion. We will also investigate oscillatory motion to describe waves and vibrations. As we work through these topics, you will gain extensive practice and discover strategies for quantitatively solving complex problems.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course is an introduction to and practice in college composition and writing across fields. We will engage with our theme of Cultivate to assess the many voices, traditions, and debates around such concepts as eco-criticism, the environment, and sustainability. We will work closely with USD’s Sustainability Office to write and engage with these issues outside of class. We will come to see these Cultivate and sustainability debates as ongoing. Having first looked at how past generations and movements have defined these concepts, we will interrogate how and why those previous ideas influence us today. Our texts will be varied and wide-ranging and will include novels, poetry, graphic arts & comics, as well as scientific, socio-historical, & popular culture sources.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, M.A.
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement for lower-division Written Communication. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Must be taken in first year.


PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Patricia Kowalski
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introduction to the science of psychology—its origins as the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, its research methodology, and a sampling of its many domains of investigation. Topics include the biological basis of behavior, how we perceive the natural world, how we learn and remember (and why we don’t), and how principles of psychological science can be applied to solving practical problems. We will apply the tools of critical and scientific thinking ​to help us understand ​the nature of misconceptions among the public. We will also discuss cognitive and motivational reasons for why ​some people do ​not change their beliefs once provided with evidence, and we will explore how we can make the world around us a healthier place to live.