Courses Linked to the Cultivate LLC

2017-2018

EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Drew Talley
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  4 units

How does a dust storm in Africa affect a sloth in South America?  Why is there kelp in San Diego, but mangroves in Florida?  This class will explain by providing you with an introduction to fundamental principles of ecology (e.g., how do populations grow? why are mice and ants in fierce competition with each other?), as well as who is who in the tree of life, and how all of these factors interact to create the world we live in. This is a required course for all EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry  3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


ARCH 101: Introduction to Architecture

LLC Faculty: Dr. Daniel Lopez-Perez
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry  4 units

Have you ever wondered about the properties that constitute an architectural project and its relationship to the environment? What physical, social and spatial forces give it shape? How can these be explored through the production of physical models, drawings, annotations, and computer aided design? Open to any student, this course offers and introduction to architectural design and the fundamentals of the discipline. Through a series of hands-on individual and collective assignments, students explore the creative processes of drawing, sketching, and model building, in an exciting and highly interactive studio setting. Studio work, desk critiques, tutorials, lectures and presentations will serve as the backdrop from which to discuss a wide range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alyson Ma
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

Have you ever wondered why things happen the way they do? What is the motivation for offering grants to college students? How does the iPhone contribute to the U.S. trade deficit? Why do firms offer new variations of their existing products? How does innovation lead to economic growth? Should price discrimination be allowed?

This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, and an introduction to market structure. We will use the economic framework to interpret real world events and economic policies. The goal of this course is to prepare you to critically judge complex issues facing the world economy.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Imane Khalil
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical and industrial). Introduction to engineering software tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 130: Introduction to Mass Media

LLC Faculty: Dr. Eric Pierson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

This is an introductory survey course focused on the development and operations of the media in the United States and abroad. The course will focus on the intersection of media with political, economic and social systems. The role of the mass media industries in the creation and support of ideology will also be one of the focal points in the class. Issues of class, race and gender have all been impacted by mass media, and one of the goals of the course is an evaluation of that impact at various historical moments. Upon completion of the course you will possess the framework for assessing the impact of media in your lives, as well as the lives of others.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Hugh Ellis
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. There is an accompanying laboratory.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Marjorie Patrick
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment.  Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Dr. Bradley Melekian
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What role has the natural world traditionally played in identity formation (i.e. in the case of Thoreau)? What states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh and uncaring natural environment force contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Robyn Davidson's Tracks. 


MATH 150:  Calculus I

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jane Friedman
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning & Problem Solving  4 units

This class provides an introduction to college level mathematical reasoning and problem solving, in the context of learning fundamental notions of differential and integral calculus. An emphasis will be placed on precise definitions, correct reasoning and communication. Students will learn to ask good questions and to deepen their learning through the questioning.  Students will practice explaining their reasoning. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

In Introduction to Mechanics you will learn the approaches and methods physicists use to uncover the workings of our universe. Physicists strive to model a wide range of phenomena that span enormous time and length scales by finding general relationships, patterns and symmetries. In this course, we will primarily study the quantitative relationships between motion, forces and energy which can describe how bacteria propel themselves to planetary motion. We will also investigate oscillatory motion to describe waves and vibrations. As we work through these topics, you will gain extensive practice and discover strategies for quantitatively solving complex problems. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.

EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Drew Talley
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  4 units

How does a dust storm in Africa affect a sloth in South America?  Why is there kelp in San Diego, but mangroves in Florida?  This class will explain by providing you with an introduction to fundamental principles of ecology (e.g., how do populations grow? why are mice and ants in fierce competition with each other?), as well as who is who in the tree of life, and how all of these factors interact to create the world we live in. This is a required course for all EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry  3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


COMM 130: Introduction to Mass Media

LLC Faculty: Dr. Eric Pierson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry  3 units

This is an introductory survey course focused on the development and operations of the media in the United States and abroad. The course will focus on the intersection of media with political, economic and social systems. The role of the mass media industries in the creation and support of ideology will also be one of the focal points in the class. Issues of class, race and gender have all been impacted by mass media, and one of the goals of the course is an evaluation of that impact at various historical moments. Upon completion of the course you will possess the framework for assessing the impact of media in your lives, as well as the lives of others.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Dr. Bradley Melekian
Core Area: Literary Inquiry  3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What role has the natural world traditionally played in identity formation (i.e. in the case of Thoreau)? What states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh and uncaring natural environment force contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Robyn Davidson's Tracks. 


MATH 150:  Calculus I

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jane Friedman
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning & Problem Solving  4 units

This class provides an introduction to college level mathematical reasoning and problem solving, in the context of learning fundamental notions of differential and integral calculus. An emphasis will be placed on precise definitions, correct reasoning and communication. Students will learn to ask good questions and to deepen their learning through the questioning.  Students will practice explaining their reasoning. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry  3 unit class, 1 unit lab

In Introduction to Mechanics you will learn the approaches and methods physicists use to uncover the workings of our universe. Physicists strive to model a wide range of phenomena that span enormous time and length scales by finding general relationships, patterns and symmetries. In this course, we will primarily study the quantitative relationships between motion, forces and energy which can describe how bacteria propel themselves to planetary motion. We will also investigate oscillatory motion to describe waves and vibrations. As we work through these topics, you will gain extensive practice and discover strategies for quantitatively solving complex problems. 

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 600 or greater, an ACT Math score of 26 or greater, or pass the Level 2 Math Placement exam to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGL XXX: TBD

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Smith
Core Area: 

Description to come