Courses Linked to the Collaborate LLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Nunn
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Why are men and women so different? (or ARE they?) Why don't people who live in the ghetto just get a job? How do strippers and drug dealers justify their actions? Why do subcultures like Goths act so weird? This course takes up all these issues and many more. We examine how U.S. society successfully (or unsuccessfully) holds itself together despite being comprised of a multitude of different sub-groups. We examine inequality: how some sub-groups of society systematically wind up with more positions of power and more social and economic rewards than other subgroups. We discuss what we each one of us can do to move toward social justice in our everyday lives.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alan Gin
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, and the workings of input markets.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Gordon Hoople
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today's world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering, but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

LLC Faculty: Dr. Mike Williams
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to ways in which individuals all over the world address social and environmental issues, and their attempts to create solutions that are “more sustainable and just” than what existed. Students will gain knowledge of social innovations led by a variety of changemakers, who have sought to catalyze positive social transformations in different spheres of action across the world. The focus lies on individuals and groups with innovative endeavors and on the process for the implementation of their vision. It explores the passion, courage, empathy, and flexibility of changemakers.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Baird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

Preceptor: Dr. Mary Brinson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines modern mass media, technology and media literacy through the lens of historical development and societal impact throughout time. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of Internet, radio, television, and journalism are discussed. Special attention will be paid to how young people can consume and engage with media in a way that is productive personally, ethically, civically, and socially.


ENGL 240: Shakespeare

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeanie Moore
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

Is Shakespeare relevant to our own time? Many novelists and filmmakers seem to think so, as they have used many of Shakespeare's plays as direct sources for their works. In this course, we will be reading and discussing Shakespeare texts as a part of their own historical and cultural milieu and then pairing them with (and comparing them to) modern works based on the plays. We'll ask several questions: Does this work? If so, why does it work? What are the points of entry into contemporary society that still correspond to Shakespeare's day?


GNDS 101: Introduction to Gender Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lori Watson
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course aims to offer an introduction to gender studies. The course will begin by examining the distinction between sex and gender, as well as how that distinction is employed in discussions of sexuality. Specifically, we will examine the so-called "nature" vs. "nurture" debate, and the most recent scientific claims about innate sex differences. Next, the course will look into contemporary debates on sex work: prostitution and trafficking. From here we will engage critically with pornography in contemporary society. Is pornography harmful? Is it best understood a protected speech? How are sex workers treated within pornography? Are they oppressed? Are they workers like any other? Next, we will turn to examine the role of gender in inequality in the workplace and the relationship to inequality within the family. Finally, we will also examine the debate around rape on college campuses and Title IX.


SPAN 201: Third Semester Spanish

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leonora Simonovis-Brown
Core Area: Second Language Competency | 3 units

Completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with continuing emphasis on communicative proficiency. At this level, students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the Spanish speaking community.


LANG 141: The Italian American Experience 

LLC Faculty: Dr. Loredana Di Martino
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Wops, Dagoes, Guineas: what is the meaning of these terms? How can a deeper understanding of America's (and San Diego's) immigrant past help us build a better future? Focusing on Italian Americans, this course will reconstruct the experience of those "undesirable" groups that came from Southern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, while examining their changing identity over time. We will discuss important issues related to diversity, inclusion and social justice, while reflecting on the strategies used by writers and filmmakers to challenge discourses about ethnicity that foster oppression. Course taught in English without pre-requisites.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Tim Randell
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course offers intensive practice in the writing process to help you become a more engaged citizen of a participatory democracy. Texts create social, political, and cultural “realities,” oftentimes by using non-straightforward aspects of language, including literary strategies and subtle rhetorical forms. Such strategies can be found in news articles, opinion pages, academic journals, advertising, political slogans, literature, and in the values, assumptions, and perspectives of diverse cultural groups. This course will help you grasp the purpose and function of rhetorical elements, traditions, and conventions while exploring issues of contemporary concern that fall under various categories, including race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and philosophical and religious belief. Students will contribute in various rhetorical contexts and genres to ongoing conversations and debates as part of the Collaborate Living and Learning Community (LLC). Assignments will include a final collaborative group research and writing project comprised of multiple discourses and discourse communities.


THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

LLC Faculty: Dr. Evelyn Kirkley
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wanted to go back in time to see what really happened at an historical event, or to change it so the future would be different? If so, this course is for you! We will recreate major events in Asian and Western religious history with large-scale role-playing games. You will play characters with distinct beliefs, personalities, and goals. Through teamwork, negotiation, writing, and speaking, we will make history and learn why people believe and practice religion as they do.


EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Nathalie Reyns
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Curious about organisms and their adaptations to natural environments? Students will learn about the characteristics of different organisms, fundamental principles in ecology (why do some populations boom, and some go bust?), and gain exposure to the challenges species face while living in different environments including terrestrial, freshwater, and marine realms. This is a required course for EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Nunn
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Why are men and women so different? (or ARE they?) Why don't people who live in the ghetto just get a job? How do strippers and drug dealers justify their actions? Why do subcultures like Goths act so weird? This course takes up all these issues and many more. We examine how U.S. society successfully (or unsuccessfully) holds itself together despite being comprised of a multitude of different sub-groups. We examine inequality: how some sub-groups of society systematically wind up with more positions of power and more social and economic rewards than other subgroups. We discuss what we each one of us can do to move toward social justice in our everyday lives.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alan Gin
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, and the workings of input markets.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Baird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

Preceptor: Dr. Mary Brinson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines modern mass media, technology and media literacy through the lens of historical development and societal impact throughout time. Students learn about the origins, history, and development of mass media. Additionally, the present structure, characteristics, and challenges in the areas of Internet, radio, television, and journalism are discussed. Special attention will be paid to how young people can consume and engage with media in a way that is productive personally, ethically, civically, and socially.


ENGL 240: Shakespeare

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeanie Moore
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

Is Shakespeare relevant to our own time? Many novelists and filmmakers seem to think so, as they have used many of Shakespeare's plays as direct sources for their works. In this course, we will be reading and discussing Shakespeare texts as a part of their own historical and cultural milieu and then pairing them with (and comparing them to) modern works based on the plays. We'll ask several questions: Does this work? If so, why does it work? What are the points of entry into contemporary society that still correspond to Shakespeare's day?


GNDS 101: Introduction to Gender Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lori Watson
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course aims to offer an introduction to gender studies. The course will begin by examining the distinction between sex and gender, as well as how that distinction is employed in discussions of sexuality. Specifically, we will examine the so-called "nature" vs. "nurture" debate, and the most recent scientific claims about innate sex differences. Next, the course will look into contemporary debates on sex work: prostitution and trafficking. From here we will engage critically with pornography in contemporary society. Is pornography harmful? Is it best understood a protected speech? How are sex workers treated within pornography? Are they oppressed? Are they workers like any other? Next, we will turn to examine the role of gender in inequality in the workplace and the relationship to inequality within the family. Finally, we will also examine the debate around rape on college campuses and Title IX.


LANG 141: The Italian American Experience 

LLC Faculty: Dr. Loredana Di Martino
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Wops, Dagoes, Guineas: what is the meaning of these terms? How can a deeper understanding of America's (and San Diego's) immigrant past help us build a better future? Focusing on Italian Americans, this course will reconstruct the experience of those "undesirable" groups that came from Southern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, while examining their changing identity over time. We will discuss important issues related to diversity, inclusion and social justice, while reflecting on the strategies used by writers and filmmakers to challenge discourses about ethnicity that foster oppression. Course taught in English without pre-requisites.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Tim Randell
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course offers intensive practice in the writing process to help you become a more engaged citizen of a participatory democracy. Texts create social, political, and cultural “realities,” oftentimes by using non-straightforward aspects of language, including literary strategies and subtle rhetorical forms. Such strategies can be found in news articles, opinion pages, academic journals, advertising, political slogans, literature, and in the values, assumptions, and perspectives of diverse cultural groups. This course will help you grasp the purpose and function of rhetorical elements, traditions, and conventions while exploring issues of contemporary concern that fall under various categories, including race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and philosophical and religious belief. Students will contribute in various rhetorical contexts and genres to ongoing conversations and debates as part of the Collaborate Living and Learning Community (LLC). Assignments will include a final collaborative group research and writing project comprised of multiple discourses and discourse communities.


THRS 114: Introduction to Catholic Theology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Brian Traska
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Description to come.