Courses Linked to the Advocate LLC

2018-2019

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Sociology is the scientific study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the theoretical and methodological tools used in the field of Sociology and to train you to use sociological perspectives in your everyday life. The tools and perspectives acquired in this course will be applied to a wide variety of specific topics studied by sociologists, including family, education, popular culture and the media, as well as the dynamics of social inequality based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation and religious identity, among other things.


LANG 142: A Cultural History of Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity | 3 units

The region known today as "Latin America" is the product of a long and complex process of conquest and colonization. Since colonial times, Latin American and Caribbean cultures have developed against a background of cultural oppression, racial conflict, political domination, colonial exploitation, and gender inequality. Out of this tension and conflict, however, emerged an extraordinary variety and wealth of literary and artistic creations. In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmic representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, and the politics of memory.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Steven Sumner
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

How does technology and international trade contribute to the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers? How does rent control and minimum wage impact society? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary and intersectional study of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in the U.S. We examine the histories of American Indians, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans; explore citizenship, conflict, community, and cultural formations; and analyze the role and function of race in U.S. society.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leonard Perry
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today's world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course is intended for majors in engineering, or those exploring careers in engineering but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


POLS 170: Intro to International Relations

LLC Faculty: Dr. Emily Edmonds-Poli
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

What does advocacy look like in the international arena? Can it be distinguished from other uses of power? Why is it so difficult to solve global problems like terrorism and poverty? Are we at the beginning of the end of an era of globalization and free trade? If so what will this mean? Why are states’ good intentions not enough to protect human rights and the global environment? This course introduces students to the study of international relations. We will examine these types of questions in our quest to gain an understanding of why states and other global actors behave the way they do.


HIST 110: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry; Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems. One of the motifs of the course is the struggle for independence and social justice, independence of Latin American nations from their colonial past, from the United States, from poverty, from underdevelopment, and social justice in politics, in social relations, and in the attempt to build a citizenry based on equality.


THRS 112: World Religions and Environmental Concern

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course will explore the major religious traditions of the world with a particular emphasis on their understandings of environmental ethics. We will engage mythic, ritual, ethical, scriptural,and theological aspects of each tradition, examining questions such as the role and responsibility of human beings in relation to other aspects of nature. A big question will be: "Is religion part of the problem or part of the solution, or perhaps both?"


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Marjorie Patrick
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Frank Jacobitz
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical and industrial). Introduction to engineering software tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, M.A.
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course explores the concept of social justice both from a global and local perspective. Some questions are: how has social justice been defined in various contexts, including those involving race, ethnicity, gender and class, and how have these concepts changed over time? We will explore these issues by considering their examination in various contexts and multiple genres and discourses. These will include writings in fiction, journalism, scholarly articles, the media and historical writings. Since this is first year writing, all the work produced will be workshopped and peer reviewed in several drafts.


EOSC 110: Introduction to Geosciences

LLC Faculty: Dr. Beth O'Shea
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitave Reasoning Competency | 3 unit class w/ lab

Have you ever looked down on the landscape from the window of a plane, or driven through a spectacular National Park and wondered: how did that form? Why does it look like that? In this course we will examine Earth’s coolest features: volcanoes, unusual rock weathering, massive landslides, billion year old fossils; and the processes that contribute to their formation. To do this you will learn about plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, the geologic timescale, rivers, deserts, earthquakes, groundwater, climate, extinction events and more! We will also examine the role of geology in social justice. For example, geoscience doesn't discriminate; earthquakes strike in both affluent and poor regions, and rivers cross national and international boundaries. This course is a 4-unit lab course satisfying the Scientific and Technological Inquiry area of the core curriculum.


THEA 230: Acting I

LLC Faculty: Mitzi Smith, M.F.A.
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course will focus primarily on the unique aesthetic of theatre through theatre exercises, scene work, discussion, and examination of a diversity of contemporary literature. Theatre exercises will be utilized to facilitate the creative process as well as foster an environment of trust within the class. Critical thinking skills will be gained through the examination of dramatic literature, discourse and written assignments. Theatre is created by the people and times that inspire it, to that end we will also be engaging social justice issues as a study in humanness.


MATH 112: Cryptography

LLC Faculty: Dr. Cameron Parker
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving | 3 units

Keeping communications secret is a crucial element of war, diplomacy, commerce, banking, and private correspondence. We will study the history of how this is done, and most importantly, we will look at all the interesting math that is used to create and break cryptosystems. We will also study how the creation of public key cryptography is crucial to the development of the modern digital economy. Finally, we will delve into controversies associated with secret communications, such as: do we want to be able to keep our correspondence secret from the government, even if it allows terrorists to do the same? Do we want to have cryptocurrencies that allow for anonymous transactions, even if this facilitates the drug trade, human trafficking, and murder for hire?

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 560 or greater, or an ACT score of 23 or greater, to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Sue Lowery
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Description to come.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Description to come.


HIST 110: Global Decolonization

LLC Faculty: Dr. Cecily Heisser
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units

Description to come.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Sociology is the scientific study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the theoretical and methodological tools used in the field of Sociology and to train you to use sociological perspectives in your everyday life. The tools and perspectives acquired in this course will be applied to a wide variety of specific topics studied by sociologists, including family, education, popular culture and the media, as well as the dynamics of social inequality based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation and religious identity, among other things.


LANG 142: A Cultural History of Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity | 3 units

The region known today as "Latin America" is the product of a long and complex process of conquest and colonization. Since colonial times, Latin American and Caribbean cultures have developed against a background of cultural oppression, racial conflict, political domination, colonial exploitation, and gender inequality. Out of this tension and conflict, however, emerged an extraordinary variety and wealth of literary and artistic creations. In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmic representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, and the politics of memory.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary and intersectional study of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in the U.S. We examine the histories of American Indians, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and European Americans; explore citizenship, conflict, community, and cultural formations; and analyze the role and function of race in U.S. society.


HIST 110: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry; Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems. One of the motifs of the course is the struggle for independence and social justice, independence of Latin American nations from their colonial past, from the United States, from poverty, from underdevelopment, and social justice in politics, in social relations, and in the attempt to build a citizenry based on equality.


THRS 112: World Religions and Environmental Concern

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course will explore the major religious traditions of the world with a particular emphasis on their understandings of environmental ethics. We will engage mythic, ritual, ethical, scriptural,and theological aspects of each tradition, examining questions such as the role and responsibility of human beings in relation to other aspects of nature. A big question will be: "Is religion part of the problem or part of the solution, or perhaps both?"


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, M.A.
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course explores the concept of social justice both from a global and local perspective. Some questions are: how has social justice been defined in various contexts, including those involving race, ethnicity, gender and class, and how have these concepts changed over time? We will explore these issues by considering their examination in various contexts and multiple genres and discourses. These will include writings in fiction, journalism, scholarly articles, the media and historical writings. Since this is first year writing, all the work produced will be workshopped and peer reviewed in several drafts.


EOSC 110: Introduction to Geosciences

LLC Faculty: Dr. Beth O'Shea
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitave Reasoning Competency | 3 unit class w/ lab

Have you ever looked down on the landscape from the window of a plane, or driven through a spectacular National Park and wondered: how did that form? Why does it look like that? In this course we will examine Earth’s coolest features: volcanoes, unusual rock weathering, massive landslides, billion year old fossils; and the processes that contribute to their formation. To do this you will learn about plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, the geologic timescale, rivers, deserts, earthquakes, groundwater, climate, extinction events and more! We will also examine the role of geology in social justice. For example, geoscience doesn't discriminate; earthquakes strike in both affluent and poor regions, and rivers cross national and international boundaries. This course is a 4-unit lab course satisfying the Scientific and Technological Inquiry area of the core curriculum.


THEA 230: Acting I

LLC Faculty: Mitzi Smith, M.F.A.
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course will focus primarily on the unique aesthetic of theatre through theatre exercises, scene work, discussion, and examination of a diversity of contemporary literature. Theatre exercises will be utilized to facilitate the creative process as well as foster an environment of trust within the class. Critical thinking skills will be gained through the examination of dramatic literature, discourse and written assignments. Theatre is created by the people and times that inspire it, to that end we will also be engaging social justice issues as a study in humanness.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Description to come.


HIST 110: Global Decolonization

LLC Faculty: Dr. Cecily Heisser
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units

Description to come. 


HIST 114: Introductory Studies in Catholic Theology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Brian Traska
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Description to come.