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Languages and Literatures

Actividades culturales - primavera 2015

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Lecture: The Politics of Economic Risk: “Electoral Targeting of Disaster Insurance in Mexico"
UCSD, CILAS Library
Contact: (858) 534-2230

Jan. 28
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Cost: Free

Biography

Maya Duru is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at UC San Diego. Prior to beginning her Ph.D., Duru worked in economic consulting and at the United Nations World Food Programme. For her residency, Duru’s project examines the electoral strategies politicians use to target a large-scale insurance program for farmers in Mexico. The project is policy relevant because Mexico's insurance program is a unique example of public provision of insurance in a developing country and is likely to emerge as a model for other countries. This work is supported by the USAID Borlaug Fellows in Global Food Security program and the Lakoff Fellowship from the UC San Diego Department of Political Science.

 

Celebration of the Museum's Newest Acquisition Sorolla and America
Balboa Park, SD Museum of Man
Contact: (619) 232-7931

Jan. 29
Time: 10 a.m.
Cost: TBA

The story of Sorolla and America begins in 1893, with Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida's prize-winning submission to the World’s Columbian Exhibition in Chicago. On the heels of this success, and a triumph at the Paris Universal Exhibition in 1900, Sorolla would be invited by the philanthropist and collector Archer Milton Huntington to show his work at the Hispanic Society in New York. This exhibition, which went on to tour the United States, would secure Sorolla a host of prestigious commissions, including an invitation to the White House to paint the official portrait of President Taft—a work which is included in the exhibition.

Sorolla’s reputation in this country would also come to rest on his picturesque paintings of Spanish subjects, including the beaches of his native Valencia. It was to produce such pleasing views that Huntington commissioned Sorolla to paint a series of murals, entitled the Visions of Spain, for the library of the Hispanic Society. This task, which would occupy the artist for years to come, may be counted his most significant American commission, but the fame of the Visions of Spain has also served to overshadow other facets of Sorolla’s success in America. This exhibition, organized by Blanca Pons-Sorolla, the artist’s great-granddaughter, brings together masterpieces that will be presented to audiences for the first time in America and Madrid.

 

Seminar: The success and failure of indigenous organizations to influence land
and natural resources policies and their implementation in the Andes

UCSD, CILAS Library
Contact: iselabrijandez@gmail.com

Jan. 29
Times: 12:30
Cost: Free

Presented by Visiting Graduate Student, Sara Eichert of Madrid, Spain.

Indigenous peoples’ organizations have surged as international actors ever since the 1990s, establishing ties with a broad network of actors on the local, national, and transnational levels. Their efforts to influence policies on those distinct levels have been manifold and targeted on different policy subareas with the idea to create policies sensitive to their demands. While some advocacy efforts have been particular fruitful resulting in the adoption of international legal norms and the recognition of ethnic diversity, studies point towards an implementation gap of those rights on the local and national levels. Differences among indigenous and peasant organizations have also become more pronounced showing varying levels of influence. The seminar will explore how some of these organizations are more successful than others to introduce their demands with regard to land and natural resource projects in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Possible explanations will be discussed as well as the shortcomings of dominant theoretical approaches.

Sara Eichert received her BA in Political Science at the Freie Universität Berlin and an MS in Latin American Studies at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM).  She is now a PhD candidate at UCM and is currently a UC EAP Visiting Research Student in Sociology and CILAS, UCSD.

 

 

Lecturer: "Metaphysical Odyssey Into the Mexican Revolution"
UCSD, IR/PS Dean's Conference Room
Contact: (858) 534-0194 |  usmex@ucsd.edu

Jan. 29
Times: 3:30
Cost: Free

Speaker: C.M. Mayo is an award-winning journalist, novelist and literary translator

In a blend of personal essay and deeply researched metaphysical and Mexican history that reads like a novel, award-winning writer and noted literary translator C.M. Mayo provides a rich introduction and the first English translation of “Spiritist Manual,” the secret book by Francisco I. Madero. Madero was the leader of Mexico's 1910 Revolution and president of Mexico from 1911 - 1913.

Join Mayo for a talk on her new book "Metaphysical Odyssey Into the Mexican Revolution: Francisco I. Madero and His Secret Book, Spiritist Manual.”

Bio: Living in and writing about Mexico for over 25 years, C.M. Mayo is the author several books about Mexico, including “The Last Prince of the Mexican Empire,” a historical novel based on a true story. Named a best book of 2009 by Library Journal, the novel was widely lauded as "a swashbuckling, riotous good time, befitting the fairy-tale promise of the opening sentence."

Nonetheless, it is based on extensive original archival research, and Mayo has lectured widely about it at the Library of Congress, the Center for U.S. Mexican Studies, the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas Austin and elsewhere. The Spanish translation by Mexican novelist and poet Agustin Cadena was published as “El ultimo principe del Imperio Mexicano” in 2010. Her previous book “Miraculous Air” is a travel memoir, rich with research and original interviews of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, from Los Cabos to Tijuana. Her first book, “Sky Over El Nido,” won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction.

 

Lecture: “Problems of accountability and representation in federations"
UCSD: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Contact: (858) 534-2230

Feb. 11
Times: 4 p.m.
Cost: Free

Alfonso Hernández-Valdez has been a research professor at ITESO's Department of Sociopolitical Studies since 1998 (Guadalajara, Mexico). He teaches and conducts original research on the consolidation of democracy in Mexico.

Hernandez-Valdez holds a Ph.D. and a master's degree from the Department of Political Science at The University of Chicago. He also holds a master's degree in public policy from the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). From 1997 to 1998 he was a professor and researcher at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE), and has been an active consultant to governments and social organizations, both in Mexico and abroad.

 

 

Lecture: "Raza Si, Guerra No: Memories of the Chicano Moratorium"
UCSD: Institute of the Americas, Malamud Room
Contact: Haydee Cervantes hcervantes@ucsd.edu

Feb. 3
Time: 4 p.m.
Cost: Free

The Chicano/a Latino/a Arts and Humanities Program presents the Annual Gracia Molina de Pick Chicana Feminism Lecture

Come meet and listen to Chicana & Chicano leaders who played instrumental roles in the creation of the National Chicano Moratorium Committee. The Moratorium was a coalition of several community organizations in East Los Angeles that addressed the impact of the military draft and the American war in Viet Nam. Our special guests will be Soledad “Chole” Alatorre, Gloria Arellanes, Katarina Davis, Irene Tovar and Rosalio Muñoz. Light refreshments will be provided.

 

Lecture: “North-South Trade Liberalization and Innovation: Evidence from NAFTA"
UCSD: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Contact: (858) 534-2230

Feb. 18
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Cost: Free

Biography

Deborah Watkins is a Mexican-born doctoral candidate in the Department of Economics at UC San Diego. Prior to starting her studies at UC San Diego, Watkins worked in economic consulting for Cornerstone Research. Her recent research explores the impact of the NAFTA tariff reductions on knowledge transfer and on the incentives for Mexican industries to innovate. She is also exploring the impact of remittances sent from the United States to Mexico on the the human capital accumulation of families in Mexico.

 

9th Annual Border Film Week
Locations vary
Contact: Martha García marthagarcia@sandiego.edu | (619) 260-4148

Feb. 23-27
Times: Vary.
Cost: Free

Every year TBI brings an exciting new line-up of documentary films to campus, giving students, faculty, and our broader community the chance to explore the border and the relationship between the U.S. and Mexico from a variety of different perspectives, and to meet some leading filmmakers. This year, the films will emphasize migration, violence, and human rights. The line-up includes several award-winning films, including Hasta el fin de los días [Until the end of reckoning] (2014), Mauricio Bidault’s story about crime scene investigators during the drug war in Mexico, and La Tierra de los Adioses [The Land of Goodbyes] (2014), Stefani Saintonge’s portrait of women on the move in southern Mexico. A series of short films will precede the featured documentary, and panel discussions with the filmmakers and faculty experts will follow each screening.

 

Lecture: “The Decline of the Nahuatl Public Spheres: Rereading
the History of Indigenous-State Relations in Mexico from 1810 – 2014"

UCSD: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Contact: (858) 534-2230

Feb. 25
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Cost: Free

Biography

Magnus Pharao Hansen is a doctoral candidate in linguistic anthropology at Brown University, with an master’s degree in Mesoamerican languages from the University of Copenhagen. He has carried out research on the Nahuatl language in the state of Morelos since 2003, and conducted several months of fieldwork on the Otomi language of San Jeronimo Acazulco, Estado de Mexico.

His dissertation project studies the current process of integration of Nahuatl in Mexican higher education after the 2003 Law of Linguistic Rights, and the ways this process ties in with social and political processes in Nahuan communities and the Mexican Nation. This research has been carried out in communities and educational institutions in Veracruz and Morelos.

He is particularly interested in the how subjective experiences with language affects educational decisions and outcomes of Nahuatl-speaking students, and in the relation of experience and life history to linguistic ideologies and language choices. He has published several articles on the Nahuatl variety of Hueyapan, Morelos.

 

Lecture: “Por la Patria Chica: Tlaxcala's Indigenous People in the
Throes of Liberal Reform, Autocracy, and Mass Upheaval, 1853-1924"

UCSD: Institute of the Americas, Deutz Conference Room
Contact: (858) 534-2230

March 4
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Cost: Free

Biography

Gerardo Ríos is a San Diego native with cultural roots in the states of Puebla and Baja California. He holds a master’s of arts degree in history from San Diego State University (2009), and has taught history, world geography and English-language development in public schools. Rios has done historical investigations in numerous archives throughout central Mexico and institutions such as Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BNAP).

His dissertation looks at how Liberal reformers in Mexico transformed society through the privatization of communal lands and mechanization of agriculture, particularly in the state of Tlaxcala, which is located in the densely-populated high central plateau. The project examines how after the Mexican Revolution the everyday negotiations between the victorious generals from Sonora and armed indigenous communities from the center-south paved the way for the creation of a post-revolutionary state, which left a legacy of single-party rule.

 

Lecture: “The politics of disease control in 20th Century Mexico"
UCSD, CILAS Library
Contact:

March 11
Times: 3:30 p.m.
Cost: Free

Biography

Micah Gell-Redman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at UC San Diego. He earned his bachelor's degree from UCLA and master's degree in public affairs from Cornell University. His primary research aim is to better understand the impact of political institutions on human health, and his dissertation explores this topic through a historical analysis of the campaigns to eliminate malaria in Mexico and United States South.

Gell-Redman also has a strong interest in the politics of immigration, having directed field work in immigrant communities in Mexico and the U.S. These two interests intersect in one of his current projects, an analysis of the political determinants of health outcomes among U.S. immigrant and minority groups.

 

Stage: Our Lady of La Tortilla
On Stage Playhouse 
291 Third Avenue, Chula Vista

March 13 - Apr. 4
Times: Thurs., Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m.
Cost:
On-line: Adults $20.  Seniors, Students, and Active Military: $17
At the door: Adults $23.  Seniors, Students, and Active Military: $20

The Cruz family is volatile even in the best of times. On one day, Nelson brings home his gringo girlfriend, his mother Dahlia obsesses about retrieving her husband from his new girlfriend, and brother Eddie shows up in a van with his failed life and pregnant girlfriend. But the real pandemonium is caused by sweet, long-suffering Dolores, Dahlia’s sister, when she sees the face of the Holy Virgin in a tortilla. This miracle brings hordes of believers and reporters to camp out on the Cruz’s lawn to await further miracles. As the family struggles with beliefs and conflicts, old and new, the endurance of family love is revealed to be the real miracle.

Playwright, Luis Santeiro. Directed by Bryant Hernández. Produced by Teri Brown. Cast are: Andre Gonzalez, Danielle Levin, Roman Rodriguez, Sandra Ruiz and Lauren Yowell.

 

Ongoing

Exhibition: Omar Lopex: Relámpago
Oceanside Museum of Art
704 Pier View Way Oceanside, CA 92054
Contact: 760.435.3720

through Feb. 8, 2015
Time: Closed Monday
        Tues.-Sat., 10am-4 p.m.
        Sun., 1-4 p.m.
Cost: Free through $8

Relámpago is Spanish for “lightning”, referring to the moments of illumination captured directly on solid metal plates for this exhibition of Omar Lopex’s intimate tintype photographs. A photograph documents reality without context: what appears to be a wide variety of traditional family portraits exploring different representations of familial relationships, is in fact a complex game of . Using a motorcycle specially outfitted with a darkroom to develop images on the spot, Lopex visited four different cities to meet strangers and become a part of their family for as long as it took to shoot and develop these images. The resulting small-scale artworks draw the viewer into a fictional world, challenging the traditional concepts of identity, personal space, and familial roles.

 

Permanent

poster of elements of the exhibition: photos and various types of basketsExhibition:  Kumeyaay: Native Californians

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The Kumeyaay, or Diegueño (as they were later called by the Spanish), are the Native American people of present-day Southern California (San Diego and western Imperial Counties) and Northern Baja. For many generations before the arrival of the Spanish, they occupied the deserts, mountains, and coasts, developing sophisticated means of adapting to the diverse environments. With the arrival of Spanish settlers in the mid-1700s, Kumeyaay lifeways had to change and adapt, often by force.

The exhibit explores traditional Kumeyaay lifeways, featuring the art of pottery and basket making, food procurement, dress and adornment, traditional medicine, games, and ceremonies. Artifacts and photographs from the museum’s collection highlight the rich cultural heritage of the Kumeyaay, offering a glimpse of the life of the ancestors of today’s present day people. The exhibit remains popular with school groups from throughout the county.

 

Exhibition:  Maya: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earthexhibit poster

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The ancient Maya tamed time. They could reckon dates far into the past and into the future by using cycles of the moon, the sun, and the planet Venus. More than a thousand years ago, they carved important dates, names of their rulers, and ceremonial events in their hieroglyphic writing on stone monuments in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador.

The huge Maya monuments displayed in the Rotunda Gallery are casts of the originals from Quirigua, a site in Guatemala. The casts were made for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition and have been on display since then, except during World War II, when the Navy turned the Museum into a hospital. Today these casts are studied by researchers who are tracing the history of the Maya through their hieroglyphic writing. The Museum’s casts are in better condition than the originals, which have suffered some weathering and erosion in the 95 years since the casts were made.

The current exhibition includes a 42-foot-wide mural of a rainforest set in the time after the Maya Classic Period (C.E. 250-900), when the great ceremonial centers became overgrown by the jungle. In the center of the mural is the lofty ceiba tree, the sacred model for the Maya cosmos. Brilliant birds, and animals such as monkeys and jaguars, are represented, as well as elements from many Maya sites.

A frequent misconception is that the Maya no longer exist. Not so—their descendants continue to carry on many of the traditions and cultural traits of their ancestors through their weaving, woodcarving, and ceramics. The Museum’s conservation of the monumental casts offers us an opportunity to present the Maya as a cultural continuum.