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Department of

Languages, Cultures and Literatures

Actividades culturales - otoño 2015

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Being Good Neighbors: Sustainable Solution to Homelessness and Addiction in a Border Community

Where: Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre
When: Thursday, September 3, 2015
Time: 6 p.m to 8 p.m.
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

Please RSVP: http://goodneighbor.eventbrite.com

What does it mean to be a good neighbor in a border city? What are the connections between homelessness, drug addiction, and the contentious relationship between the United States and Mexico? How can we shift the paradigm from a war on drugs and a war on homelessness to something more sustainable and humane? How can students, faculty, and ordinary citizens get involved?

The Trans-Border Institute invites you to a panel discussion including Father Joe’s Villages, The San Diego Police Department, Fundación Gaia, and assorted USD faculty where we will address these and other issues. We convened the same event last year with a focus on the link between deportation and homelessness; this year we will keep the focus on the border but shift thematically to the impact of drug addiction and enforcement. What does it mean to be a good neighbor in a border city? What are the connections between homelessness, drug addiction, and the contentious relationship between the United States and Mexico? How can we shift the paradigm from a war on drugs and a war on homelessness to something more sustainable and humane? How can students, faculty, and ordinary citizens get involved?

The Trans-Border Institute invites you to a panel discussion including Father Joe’s Villages, The San Diego Police Department, Fundación Gaia, and assorted USD faculty where we will address these and other issues. We convened the same event last year with a focus on the link between deportation and homelessness; this year we will keep the focus on the border but shift thematically to the impact of drug addiction and enforcement.

Annual Women PeaceMakers Panel

Where: Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre
When: Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Time: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

The Women PeaceMakers Program documents the stories and peacebuilding practices of international women leaders. Each year, four women are paired with professional writers to record their unique stories of living in conflict and building peace.

Join us for the Annual Women PeaceMakers Panel, where all four peacemakers will speak on their work, with a question-and-answer session to follow.

Please check back for more information about the 2015 Women PeaceMakers and registration information for the event.

“Columbus Day or Day of Indigenous Resistance: (De) Colonizing Universal Thought”

Where: Salomon Lecture Hall
When: Monday, October 12, 2015
Time: 5:30 p.m. to 6:50 p.m.
Free admission
Contact: Julia Medina (jmedina@sandiego.edu)

This roundtable conversation will reflect n the significance of October 12, traditionally known as “Columbus Day” in the United States.  For the Native and many other people of the Americas, the meaning of the day is problematic, as it reinforces a contested and fictitious narrative of the “discovery” of the American continent.  This panel brings together faculty across different departments from the College of Arts and Sciences to talk about the historical narratives of “discovery”, “encounter,” or even “covering the other,” a phrase coined by the philosopher Enrique Dussel,  In discussing the (de) colonization processes, panelist will consider notions of modernity, development, and epistemological hierarchies in the construction of the West and the colonized other, as this day has not only shaped such categories, but is has also continued to raise controversy regarding what is acknowledge, celebrated and erased.

Conversation with the Women PeaceMakers

Where: Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre
When: Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Time: 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

The Women PeaceMakers Program documents the stories and peacebuilding practices of international women leaders. Each year, four women are paired with professional writers to record their unique stories of living in conflict and building peace.

Join us for four daytime events featuring candid, on-stage one-on-one interviews with an individual peacemaker, followed by a question-and-answer session with the audience.

Hidden Embers: Domestic and Gender-Based Violence during Mexico’s Drug War

Where: Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre
When: Monday, November 2, 2015
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

Please, stay tuned for further details.

Domestic violence is a form of dictatorship and terrorism nourished on silence, privacy, and shame. It traps its victims and converts them into accomplices to their own suffering, who blame and question themselves. But, these private spaces are socially constructed and defined. They require a gaze that avoids recognizing what happens behind closed doors, resistance to enact policies that protect survivors and seek justice on their behalf, and a tolerance for cover stories and cultural narratives that hide brutal violence behind essentialized stereotypes of sex and gender.

In the United States, the causes of domestic violence tend to follow the trajectory of the rapid spread of new private spaces and technologies that isolate women from previous forms of sociability – air conditioning, the suburbs, the internet, etc. In Latin America, domestic violence tends to track the relative weight of the cultural discourse of house and street in the construction of citizenship, a discourse that tends to be asserted during times of economic and political crisis. In contemporary Mexico, there’s a powerful causal agent for domestic and gender based violence with elements of both the creation of new private spaces and cultural retrenchment in the face of crisis – the wave of spectacular violence we call “the drug war.”

This event will bring together leading activists from Sinaloa, Mexico – the epicenter of the drug war in Mexico – to explore this complex reality in consultation with the Women PeaceMakers, and other Kroc School partners.

The Art of Peace: Creative Approaches and Conflict Transformation

Where: Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre
When: Wednesday, November 11, 2015 – Saturday, November 14, 2015
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

From November 11-14, 2015, the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice (IPJ) of the University Of San Diego Kroc School Of Peace Studies will host a multi-day symposium exploring the use of the arts in peacebuilding. The symposium will feature local, national and international playwrights, filmmakers, poets, musicians, visual artists and academics who are mobilizing the creative power of the arts to break the cycle of conflict.

Performances, exhibitions and workshops will demonstrate how the arts can be used to resolve conflict nonviolently, deescalate violence, transform relationships, support individual and community healing, and build capacities for peace. By providing space for artists to reflect on their practice, share their learning and network with other peacebuilders, the IPJ will highlight the importance of this rapidly growing field of arts-based peacebuilding.

Please join us to experience the unique and universal ability of art to engage audiences in discourses on peace, justice and social transformation. Events will be hosted on the USD campus and at venues throughout San Diego.

Exhibit:  “43 Artist for Atotzinapa III”

Where: Centro Cultural de la Raza
When: Wednesday, November 11, 2015 – Saturday, November 14, 2015
Contact: Megan Theriault (mtheriault@sandiego.edu)

San Diego's Centro Cultural de la Raza was founded in 1970 as a Chicano Community Cultural Center and functions as an alternative space that encourages and facilitates artistic growth and cultural interchange in the San Diego/Tijuana region. The Centro provides classes and features a dynamic inter-disciplinary schedule of events which includes exhibits, musical performances, installation art, readings, receptions, Azteca dance, Teatro Chicano, Ballet Folklorico, film screenings and other events.

Normal Business Hours: 12-4pm every day except Monday. We also have workshops and other special events after hours. Please see our Events Calendar page.

Admission: Suggested donation of $5.00. We are an all-volunteer run organization that depends on your donations to provide exciting programing that meets the needs of the San Diego community.

The Emergence of the PRI: Land, Civil Society and Party Formation in Post-Revolutionary Mexico.

Where: UC San Diego, Institute of the Americas, Deutz Room
When: Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Time: 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Contact: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-emergence-of-the-pri-tickets-17852574531

Speaker: Edwin F. Ackerman, Ph.D. candidate in Sociology, UC Berkeley Mexico's Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) was central to one of the longest-lived regimes of the twentieth century. Yet, the PRI’s emergence remains severely understudied in a body of work devoted mostly to explaining how the party maintained power once it was consolidated. In his research, Ackerman examines why the PRI formed as a mass party in some regions, but not others despite attempts to do so and similarity in conditions.

 

Fall Art Excursion: Tecate Region

Where: Tecate Region
When: Monday, November 5, 2015
Time: 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Please, stay tuned for further details.
Contact:  Mingei International Museum.  Balboa Park, Plaza Panama. (619 239-0003)

Save the date for a hop across the border to see the cultural heritage of the Tecate region. Enjoy a diverse day of activities just across the border including tours of Ceramica JR Tile Factory, Rancho La Puerta and lunch as Asao. More information regarding pricing, itinerary and reservations will soon follow.

"Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud": Byron Kim Adapts the Black on black Cosmology of María Martínez

Where: MCASD Downtown, Jacobs Building: 700 Prospect Street. La Jolla, CA 92037
When: Friday, July 17 through Sunday, Nov. 01, 2015

"Pond Lily Over Mushroom Cloud": Byron Kim Adapts the Black on Black Cosmology of Maria Martinez presents a new project by La Jolla-born, New York-based artist Byron Kim, produced on the occasion of the Centennial of the Panama–California Exposition. Known for his monochromatic paintings, Kim explores subjects of cultural identity, race, politics, and art history, all in the guise of pure abstraction.

Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed

Where: San Diego Natural History Museum
When: June, 2015 – January, 2016
General Admission: $ 16
Contact:  Call Customer Services (619) 255 0195

The ruined cities of the ancient Maya have captured our imaginations since news of their discovery in the jungles of Central America was published in the 1840s. Extensive research has uncovered a culture with a sophisticated worldview that, during its Classic period (250-900 AD), rivaled any civilization in Europe. Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed, an original exhibition, sheds light on this mysterious and majestic ancient culture.

At 10,000 square feet, Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed is the largest exhibition about the ancient Maya ever to be displayed in the United States. Created by the Science Museum of Minnesota, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the Museum of Science, Boston, the exhibition debuted in St. Paul, Minnesota in 2013 and now makes it West Coast premiere.

Maya: Hidden Worlds Revealed uses a combination of hundreds of authentic artifacts, immersive environments, multimedia components, and hands-on activities to explore the rise and eventual decline of these fascinating ancient cities.

The exhibition gives visitors a glimpse at a cross-section of Maya life—from divine kings who ruled powerful cities to the artisans and laborers who formed the backbone of Maya society.

Visitors will see spectacular examples of Maya artistry made by masters of their craft, along with objects from everyday life. They’ll also get a close look at the scientific work being carried out at key Maya sites across Central America to understand exactly how we know what we know of the once-hidden Maya of the ancient past.

Presented in English and Spanish.

 

Permanent

 

poster of elements of the exhibition: photos and various types of basketsExhibition:  Kumeyaay: Native Californians

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The Kumeyaay, or Diegueño (as they were later called by the Spanish), are the Native American people of present-day Southern California (San Diego and western Imperial Counties) and Northern Baja. For many generations before the arrival of the Spanish, they occupied the deserts, mountains, and coasts, developing sophisticated means of adapting to the diverse environments. With the arrival of Spanish settlers in the mid-1700s, Kumeyaay lifeways had to change and adapt, often by force.

The exhibit explores traditional Kumeyaay lifeways, featuring the art of pottery and basket making, food procurement, dress and adornment, traditional medicine, games, and ceremonies. Artifacts and photographs from the museum’s collection highlight the rich cultural heritage of the Kumeyaay, offering a glimpse of the life of the ancestors of today’s present day people. The exhibit remains popular with school groups from throughout the county.

 

Exhibition:  Maya: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earthexhibit poster

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The ancient Maya tamed time. They could reckon dates far into the past and into the future by using cycles of the moon, the sun, and the planet Venus. More than a thousand years ago, they carved important dates, names of their rulers, and ceremonial events in their hieroglyphic writing on stone monuments in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador.

The huge Maya monuments displayed in the Rotunda Gallery are casts of the originals from Quirigua, a site in Guatemala. The casts were made for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition and have been on display since then, except during World War II, when the Navy turned the Museum into a hospital. Today these casts are studied by researchers who are tracing the history of the Maya through their hieroglyphic writing. The Museum’s casts are in better condition than the originals, which have suffered some weathering and erosion in the 95 years since the casts were made.

The current exhibition includes a 42-foot-wide mural of a rainforest set in the time after the Maya Classic Period (C.E. 250-900), when the great ceremonial centers became overgrown by the jungle. In the center of the mural is the lofty ceiba tree, the sacred model for the Maya cosmos. Brilliant birds, and animals such as monkeys and jaguars, are represented, as well as elements from many Maya sites.

A frequent misconception is that the Maya no longer exist. Not so—their descendants continue to carry on many of the traditions and cultural traits of their ancestors through their weaving, woodcarving, and ceramics. The Museum’s conservation of the monumental casts offers us an opportunity to present the Maya as a cultural continuum.