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Actividades culturales - otoño 2014

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Exhibition: Omar Lopex: Relámpago
Oceanside Museum of Art
704 Pier View Way Oceanside, CA 92054
Contact: 760.435.3720

Nov. 8 through Feb. 8, 2015
Time: Closed Monday
        Tues.-Sat., 10am-4 p.m.
        Sun., 1-4 p.m.
Cost: Free through $8

Relámpago is Spanish for “lightning”, referring to the moments of illumination captured directly on solid metal plates for this exhibition of Omar Lopex’s intimate tintype photographs. A photograph documents reality without context: what appears to be a wide variety of traditional family portraits exploring different representations of familial relationships, is in fact a complex game of . Using a motorcycle specially outfitted with a darkroom to develop images on the spot, Lopex visited four different cities to meet strangers and become a part of their family for as long as it took to shoot and develop these images. The resulting small-scale artworks draw the viewer into a fictional world, challenging the traditional concepts of identity, personal space, and familial roles.

 

Lecture: "Responding to God's Call on
the U.S./Mexico Border"

USD: Hahn University Center, Forums A and B
Contact: Jim Davis | jdavis@ivcusa.org | 619.677.2545

Nov. 13
Time: 7-9 p.m.
Cost: Free

Every year, thousands of migrant men, women and children are deported to Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. They often arrive with only the clothes on their backs and a small plastic bag that contains their belongings. Many times, they do not know where to turn to receive a meal, find shelter or make a phone call. They arrive emotionally and psychologically devastated, separated from their loved ones and unable to visit or work legally in the United States.

Fr. Sean Carroll, S.J., Executive Director of the Kino Border Initiative, comes to San Diego to share the work of KBI, speak on the current immigration crisis and need for reform, and suggest how San Diegans might respond to God’s call to uphold the dignity of the human person and the sacredness of human life with people on our borders.

 

Film: Libertador
Digital Gym
2921 El Cajon Blvd. SD 92104
Contact: 619.230-1938

Nov. 14-19
Times: see below
Cost: $8.50 w/ student ID

Venezuela's official submission to the 2015 Oscars, Libertador is about Simon Bolivar who fought over 100 battles against the Spanish Empire in South America. He rode over 70,000 miles on horseback. His military campaigns covered twice the territory of Alexander the Great. His army never conquered — it liberated.

Friday, November 14th:
Saturday, November 15th:
Sunday, November 16th:
Monday, November 17th:
Tuesday, November 18th:
Wednesday, November 19th:
Thursday, November 20th:

3:45, 6, 8:15 p.m.
2, 6, 8:15 p.m.
1, 5, 7:15 p.m.
2:45, 5, 7:15 p.m.
2:45, 5 p.m.
2:45, 5 p.m.
2:45, 5, 7:15 p.m.

 

Buy Tickets

Watch Trailer

 

Films from Spain
Balboa Park: Museum of Photographic Arts
Contact: 619.615.3188

Nov. 18, Dec. 16, Jan. 27, Feb. 24
Time: 7 p.m.
Cost: $7 donation

The House of Spain in San Diego, a nonprofit devoted to promote the culture of Spain in San Diego, organizes Films from Spain. The event is a series of screenings of Spanish films, held once a month from October until February at the Museum of Photographic Arts in Balboa Park. Attendees will have the opportunity to enjoy outstanding films from Spain, from successful recent releases to all-time masterpieces, some of which have never been screened before in San Diego.

The event is supported by the program Spain Arts & Culture of the Embassy of Spain's Cultural Office.

Films from Spain aims to combine great cinema with a taste of Spain’s culture -- Spaniards love casual and lively community gatherings, and the screenings will provide a perfect environment for a gathering inspired by a shared appreciation of cinema and of the Spanish way of life.

Nov. 18
Volver (To return)
- Comedy/Drama

Dec. 16
Mataharis
-
Comedy/Drama

Jan. 27
25 Kilates (25 Carat)
- Thriller

Feb. 24
Tapas Bar
- Comedy/Drama

 

Mariachi Concert
USD: Shiley Theatre
Contact: 619.260.4171 | www.sandiego.edu/cas/music

Dec. 11
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Cost: $5 w/student ID, $8 seniors, $10 general

Mariachi ensemble will be performing traditional music of Mexico directed by Serafin Paredes. Tickets are on sale at the door only.

 

 

Ongoing

 

poster of elements of the exhibition: photos and various types of basketsExhibition:  Kumeyaay: Native Californians

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The Kumeyaay, or Diegueño (as they were later called by the Spanish), are the Native American people of present-day Southern California (San Diego and western Imperial Counties) and Northern Baja. For many generations before the arrival of the Spanish, they occupied the deserts, mountains, and coasts, developing sophisticated means of adapting to the diverse environments. With the arrival of Spanish settlers in the mid-1700s, Kumeyaay lifeways had to change and adapt, often by force.

The exhibit explores traditional Kumeyaay lifeways, featuring the art of pottery and basket making, food procurement, dress and adornment, traditional medicine, games, and ceremonies. Artifacts and photographs from the museum’s collection highlight the rich cultural heritage of the Kumeyaay, offering a glimpse of the life of the ancestors of today’s present day people. The exhibit remains popular with school groups from throughout the county.

 

yoga practitioners on both sides of the border fenceBorder Encuentro

Where: Friendship Park/El Parque de la Amistad [Directions]
Hours: Every Saturday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Cost: Free
Phone: www.borderencuentro.org

About

Eco-Kite CompetitionBorder encuentro (formerly Border Meetup) activities consist of events in which people from both sides of the San Diego/Tijuana border meet through the border fence on the beach or at Friendship Park at the San Diego/Tijuana border. Past activities include Yoga at the Border and an Eco-Kite competition (pictured) as well as creating and maintaining a native-species bi-national garden, and painting the fence.

Mission

Our goal is to bring people together by finding a theme that has no borders, often has a direct effect on improving the region, and always results in friendships across cultural boundaries.

 

Permanent


Mayan statuette
Exhibition:  Maya: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth

Where: Balboa Park: San Diego Museum of Man
Hours: Daily, 10-4:30
Cost: Students with ID: $7.50
Phone: 619-239-2001

The ancient Maya tamed time. They could reckon dates far into the past and into the future by using cycles of the moon, the sun, and the planet Venus. More than a thousand years ago, they carved important dates, names of their rulers, and ceremonial events in their hieroglyphic writing on stone monuments in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador.

The huge Maya monuments displayed in the Rotunda Gallery are casts of the originals from Quirigua, a site in Guatemala. The casts were made for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition and have been on display since then, except during World War II, when the Navy turned the Museum into a hospital. Today these casts are studied by researchers who are tracing the history of the Maya through their hieroglyphic writing. The Museum’s casts are in better condition than the originals, which have suffered some weathering and erosion in the 95 years since the casts were made.

The current exhibition includes a 42-foot-wide mural of a rainforest set in the time after the Maya Classic Period (C.E. 250-900), when the great ceremonial centers became overgrown by the jungle. In the center of the mural is the lofty ceiba tree, the sacred model for the Maya cosmos. Brilliant birds, and animals such as monkeys and jaguars, are represented, as well as elements from many Maya sites.

A frequent misconception is that the Maya no longer exist. Not so—their descendants continue to carry on many of the traditions and cultural traits of their ancestors through their weaving, woodcarving, and ceramics. The Museum’s conservation of the monumental casts offers us an opportunity to present the Maya as a cultural continuum.