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Faculty Activities

Fall 2009

Chris Adler, Ph.D.
SINGAPORE
Music

Dr. Adler was been invited to conduct a 9-day residency focused on his cross-cultural compositions for Asian and Western instruments. The residency will include a public lecture about his music, performances of his compositions given by himself and in collaboration with student performers at the Conservatory, rehearsals and coaching of performers, and master classes on the subjects of composition, improvisation and his commissioning of new works for solo Thai mouth organ.

Susan Babka, Ph.D.
ITALY & GERMANY
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Babka will be conducting research for a book, Christology of the Mercy Seat: Imagining the God Who Suffers. She is interested in seeing the images employing the Gnadenstuhl motif in art in context, since so many of these images are in churches, especially those in the countryside that are not otherwise accessible.

Rachel Blaser, Ph.D.
ITALY
Psychology

Dr. Blaser will present her research at the European Behavioral Pharmacology Society annual meeting. Her research addresses the effects of alcohol on zebrafish behavior, and she will be presenting the results of experiments on alcohol as an anxiolytic in zebrafish.

Russell Fuller, Ph.D.
ITALY & JERUSALEM
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Fuller will attend the International Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature and participate in a seminar panel on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Hebrew Bible. Additionally, he will do individual research and collaborative research with colleagues at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem on the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible. Dr. Fuller will also present a paper at the Fifteenth World Congress of Jewish Studies. His paper is entitled "Allusions and Citations of biblical Texts in Non-Biblical Compositions from the Judean Desert and their use in the Textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible."

Sarah Gray, Ph.D.
MEXICO
Marine Science

Dr. Gray will continue her ongoing field research program to study the impact of sedimentation on coral reefs. The purposes of her trip are to continue ongoing reef sediment monitoring research with three USD undergraduate students, expand her previous research agenda to include storm water sampling in the Coral Bay watershed; and to visit her field site with a potential research collaborator from Mexico. Finally, she will conduct meetings with research and outreach collaborators including: the Coral Bay Community Council, the Friends of the Virgin Islands National Park, and researchers at the University of the Virgin Islands.

Lawrence Hinman, Ph.D.
JAPAN
Philosophy

Dr. Hinman's trip has two principal purposes: to present a paper at the Asia-Pacific Computing and Philosophy 2009 and to visit at least two major robotics labs in Tokyo to see first-hand the current state of the art in robotics research in Japan. This trip is part of a much larger project, a book on robotic ethics, which he hopes to complete during his sabbatical in spring, 2012. The project began with a paper he presented at the First Asia-Pacific Computing and Philosophy Conference in Bangkok, Thailand in 2005. This paper, “I, Immanuel: Kantian Robotics,” presented an analysis of some of the key philosophical issues in the development of humanoid robots. It was subsequently published in a volume entitled, Computing and Philosophy in Asia (Cambridge, 2008). His current work is focusing specifically on the ethical issues involved with such robots, and he will be presenting a refereed paper at the IEEE’s ICRA2009 robotics conference in Kobe on ethical issues in companion robots, currently a very controversial issue in Japan and South Korea, both of which have made substantial national commitments to the development of humanoid robots to care for the elderly in their respective countries.

Joseph Jeon, Ph.D.
SOUTH KOREA
English

Dr. Jeon's book project, Scenes from the Uninhabited Present: Korean Film at the End of History, examines the recent boom in South Korean Cinema in the context of the traumatizing 20th-century history of the nation. Arising in a context of occupation by Japan and then by the United States as well as a bloody war that divided the country, both geographically and ideologically, modern Korean history is often defined as traumatic. In the recent films Dr. Jeon examines, however, the trope of forgetting becomes increasingly prominent, which fundamentally conflicts with the narratives of trauma that pervade the nation. How does one feel trauma when one can no longer remember the injury? His book argues that this is the fundamental dilemma of post-modern Korean culture: how does a nation whose national self-conception depends on historical trauma continue to define itself once the memory of the trauma fades into the past? The first chapter of the book examines Park Chan-wook’s Oldboy (2003), which won the Grand Prix at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival. The horrifying experience of its protagonist,he argues, represents the plight of the Korean salary man working for the large conglomerate corporations that dominate Korean business. After the 1997 IMF-crisis in Korea, it was the salary men and not the conglomerates that suffered. Suicides were common and many felt a sense of betrayal from these companies which had for so long preached a gospel of familial loyalty that rang decidedly false during these difficult financial times. Dr. Jeon has already published the first chapter of the book in the major journal in his field and this grant will help fuel the momentum he has generated toward the completion of his manuscript. At USD, Dr. Jeon hopes that this research will enrich his current class in Asian American literature as well as open avenues for new classes on the topic in the English Department.

Eric Jiang, Ph.D.
FRANCE
Math & Computer Science

Dr. Jiang's project is entitled “Semi-Supervised Text Classification Using RBF Networks” and it investigates text classifiers that integrate clustering algorithms into RBF artificial neural networks and can learn for classification from a very small number of labeled training samples and a large pool of unlabeled data effectively. The purpose of the travel is Dr. Jiang's participation in the 15th ACM conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD) in Paris, France. The ACM KDD conference is the premier international forum for data mining researchers, scientists and practitioners to share their ideas, latest research results and experiences.

Molly McClain, Ph.D.
UNITED KINGDOM
History

Dr. McClain will present a paper, “‘Going Dutch’: Culture and Identity in the Life of Queen Mary II,” at The Bangor Conference on the Restoration: Politics, Religion, and Culture in Britain and Ireland in the 1680s, sponsored by the Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Bangor and Aberystwyth. Dr. McClain will also participate in a panel on Queen Mary II.

Vidya Nadkarni, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
Political Science

Dr. Nadkarni will be presenting her paper, "Diversity, Inequality, and Security: Indian and Iranian Policies in the Caspian Region," together with a colleague from the University of Central Florida at the ISA-ABRI Joint International Meeting in Rio de Janeiro. She will be examining Indian policies in the Caspian region and will explore the geopolitical and geoeconomic aspects of India’s goal for energy security.

Marjorie Patrick, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
Biology

Dr. Patrick will travel to Brazil to collect mosquito larvae from Amazonian rainforest breeding sites to study their physiological mechanisms of maintaining body fluid salt composition in the face of unusual environmental water chemistry. This research trip will also serve to restart her study of Amazonian mosquitoes, which she had initiated during her Ph.D training, and provide the foundation for a long-term, ongoing collaboration. Results from this research will lead to at least one publication and form the basis of a National Science Foundation grant to support yearly expeditions to the Amazon, with the hopes of taking USD students to provide them with an international research experience. Dr. Patrick's previous research trips to Brazil were funded by NSF International Programs and she aims to build upon this experience. Additionally, the biology that she learns and the research techniques that she will emply while at INPA, are and have been integrated into the biology courses she teaches at USD, specifically her upper division Invertebrate Physiology course -Bio 477,477L. Dr. Patrick's previous research experiences in Brazil have not only had a tremendous impact on her scholarly activities but have enhanced her appreciation for other cultures. While living in Manaus, one learns much about the history, culture, food, music, etc of the different groups that together, call themselves Brasileiros.She has truly enjoyed immersing herself into everyday life in Brazil.

Emily Reimar-Barry, Ph.D.
KENYA
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Reimar-Barry will be participating in a collaborative research project entitled "Global Feminist Theologies Symposium and Collaborative Research Project." The goal of this project is to bring together feminist theologians from Africa and the United States in order to create a space where they can listen to one another and engage in constructive dialogue and collaborative research. The project will include ten participants from the United States and various African countries will gather in Nairobi, Kenya for a symposium on Global Feminist Theologies at the Maryknoll Institute of African Studies. The Maryknoll program will be directed by Anne Nasimiyu-Wasike, and will integrate fieldwork with the study of key texts in African feminist theology and ethics.The goal of the program at the Maryknoll Institute is to create an atmosphere of cross-cultural dialogue that will pave the way for the second phase of this project, a one-week listening symposium directed by Susan A. Ross. Participants will reflect upon immersion pedagogy in light of global feminist and postcolonial concerns.

Natalie Reyns, Ph.D.
MEXICO
Marine Science

Dr. Reyns will travel to Mexico in order to conduct further research assessing the blue crab population dynamics in Bahía Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico. This project will provide valuable data regarding the population dynamics of blue crabs (Callinectes bellicosus, a commerciallyharvested species) and involve fishers to improve scientific communications with local stakeholders. The results of this study will be available to Mexican federal and state scientists, and Dr. Reyns hopes that this information will help fisheries scientists develop a management strategy to ensure a sustainable blue crab fishery (thereby providing economic stability to the region). Blue crabs have been harvested in Bahía Magdalena for the last 20 years, but the fishery is currently unregulated and little is known about the blue crab population. Thus, the overall objective of this study is to obtain data that will be used for a preliminary assessment of the blue crab stock in Bahía Magdalena. The team's primary approach will involve quantifying the number of blue crab postlarvae settling in estuarine habitats (e.g. seagrass habitats that serve as nurseries) near Puerto San Carlos, Bahía Magdalena.

Sandra Sgoutas-Emch, Ph.D.
NORWAY
Psychology

Purpose of the travel is to attend the European Congress of Psychology in Oslo and present research on community outreach in the classroom.The research that will be presented at the conference is based on her project entitled "Helping Communities Help Themselves: Applying Civic and Political Engagement to a Health Psychology Course." The project focuses on the implementation of community service learning and political engagement in health psychology of women and ethnic minorities. The research is part of a requirement for a fellowship Dr. Sgoutas-Emch was awarded from the California Campus Compact and Carnegie foundation for instituting political engagement in the classroom. The students in her course worked with community partners to design and administer a survey for a family success center located in a local middle school. The center provides services to help families in the Linda Vista Community. Students then went into the classrooms of the middle school and held informal focus groups with the student body on what they would like the center to be. Based on the data collected, suggestions for helping the center in the future were proposed. Some of these suggestions are now being implemented. The European Congress gathers scholars from all over the world to discuss their research. The conference also does a wonderful job of exposing the attendees to the local culture with its various programs and activities. Dr. Sarter is also interested in different health care models and Norway has a very progressive health care system. She routinely use the information she learns at these conferences in her classes.

Michael Wagner, Ph.D.
POLAND
Philosophy

The International Society for Neoplatonic Studies conference in association with the Jesuit University of Philosophy and Education (“Ignatianum”). Dr. Wagner will present a paper, “The Artist as Demiurge in Plotinus” and chair at least one paper session. He will also act as secretary-treasure and at-large member of the Board of Directors of the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies. During his trip he will also be able to discuss and “market” his recently published book, The Enigmatic Reality of Time: Aristotle, Plotinus, and Today, whose publisher (E.J. Brill: Leiden & Boston) also will have a book display at the conference. Finally, Dr. Wagner hopes to interact with philosophers and classicists in his area of research from universities in such diverse locales as Germany, France, Britain, Italy, Israel, Canada, Mexico, India, and of course Poland.

Spring 2009

Jonathan Bowman, Ph.D.
PANAMA
Communication Studies

The main purpose of this study was to conduct qualitative and quantitative measurement of social and cultural attitudes towards individuals possessing a skill set associated with new communication technologies, including subsequent assessment of sociological norms and the impact on local communication patterns both within and between native and expatriate US populations. A secondary purpose was to foster increased collaborative linkages between both USD and the Universidad Tecnologica de Panama, with the potential opportunity of building an international service-learning immersion trip associated with the nonprofit institution Impacto Foundation.

Leeva Chung, Ph.D.
KOREA
Communication Studies

CIEE’s new seminar “Understanding Modern Korea” was an absolute must for Dr. Chung's teaching, scholarship, and service. Briefly, in the past ten years, South Korea has morphed from an agrarian nation into the world’s tenth largest economy and Asia’s fourth largest. As an intercultural scholar who looks at identity, pop-culture, and team development, the increasing rivalry between China and Japan in the region will absolutely impact her theoretical understanding and implication of this transformation of South Korea. Her second edition book, Understanding Intercultural Communication, with Dr. Stella Ting-Toomey, is in the process of being revised and renovated. Going to CIEE’s seminar allowed Dr. Chung to produce the most current and updated resources to examine the nature of Korea’s place in the evolving geopolitical and geoeconomic landscape of Asia. Topics listed (e.g., Modern and Pre-modern Korea; Modernization and Social Transformation in Korea; Korean and East Asian Economic Development Model; Confucian Korea: Past and Present; Contemporary Korean Pop Culture) will strengthen four book chapters: values, identity, conflict, and pop-culture. Her newest research agenda is linking plastic surgery and beauty to ethnic identity problems and struggles. Going to CIEE will benefit her contacts and allow her to discuss the transformation of ethnic identity in depth. Dr. Chung's research agenda is closely related to her teaching agenda. The possibility of adding more insight of South Korea will go beyond existing stereotypical views of South Korea and allow me to explore the dynamism of Korea’s past and current transformation—compare and contrast with her knowledge of China and Japan as well.

Alana Cordy-Collins, Ph.D.
GALAPAGOS ISLANDS
Anthropology

During Dr. Cordy-Collins' 36 years of South American archaeological field work, one of her main areas of investigation has been cross-cultural contacts and influences. She, as well as other investigators have demonstrated that the ancient Ecuadorians sailed their large balsa wood rafts as far north as West Mexico on extended ventures. Some of the most intriguing possible contacts, however, remain to be adequately investigated. Both artifactual and written documents suggest that during the Inka Empire (and possibly earlier) mainlanders sailed considerable distances offshore, making contact with the inhabitants of Easter Island (Isla de Pascua/Rapa Nui) and at least some of the Galapagos Islands. This proposal funded the second part of research begun with IOG support on Easter Island, Chile that focused on stone masonry technology and petroglyphic iconography. There Dr. Cordy-Collins met her stated goal of producing a digital photographic data base of both categories to compare with mainland prehistoric examples, for instance, Inka stone architecture from the Cuzco region (where she excavated in 1989 and 1999). She followed a similar approach on the Galapagos, as well as mainland Ecuador and far north Peru (which is environmentally/prehistorically part of the Ecuadorian sphere), first by photographing artifact collections (mainly of ceramic wares in museums) that she could then compare to a photo data base of north coast mainland pottery that she's compiled over the last three and a half decades. She envisions the proposed research as the first stage in a larger, on-going investigative program that will lead to student

David De Haan, Ph.D.
CANADA
Chemistry

Dr. De Haan co-organized and co-chaireda session with John Liggio of Environment Canada at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Joint Assembly, a major international conference. The session was entitled “Heterogeneous and liquid-phase chemistry of aerosol and cloud,” and has been proposed to the AGU. He also presented a research talk on aerosol-forming reactions between the most common aldeydes and amines in clouds.

Kevin Guerrieri, Ph.D.
BRAZIL & COLOMBIA
Languages and Literatures

This project speaks directly to the international mission of USD and to Dr. Guerrieri's professional growth in scholarship, teaching, and service. He attends the international congress of the Latin American Studies Association on a regular basis. This is the most important association for researchers in his area of specialization, and the conference provides excellent opportunities to explore some of the most current tendencies in this interdisciplinary field. The paper he is going to present is part of his ongoing research projects on the topics of displacement, configurations of urban space, and subject formation in the contemporary Colombian novel. Likewise, he teaches Spanish 304, Cultural History of Latin America, which includes the study of Brazil. This trip will allow him to deepen his knowledge of this country and continue to strengthen this course. In addition, he has been working on a task force that is developing a minor in Latin American Studies. The LASA conference was an ideal setting to make contacts and work directly with colleagues from other institutions with similar programs. He also traveled to Colombia, where he conducted research for both the paper he later presented in Brazil and other projects.

John Halaka, MFA
ISRAEL & PALESTINE
Art

During the summer of 2008, Dr. Halaka began recording interviews in Palestine and Israel for two documentary film projects. In the first project he interviewed a few survivors of the Palestinian generation of the Nakba (the Great Catastrophe). He also researched, found and filmed the ruins of their destroyed villages inside Israel. The men and women from that generation experienced the destruction of Palestinian civil and political society as well as the ethnic cleansing of 85% of the Palestinian population from the land that became Israel in 1948. The survivors of that generation are now in their 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Many still live in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza and neighboring Arab countries while those who were not expelled in 1948, or managed to return to their homeland, live in Israel as Arab citizens of the Jewish State. Their stories have seldom been recorded, and their experiences and memories before, during and since 1948 are rapidly disappearing as that generation ages and dies. He returned to Palestine and Israel during the early summer of 2009 to continue recording interviews with these forgotten survivors, as well continue researching, finding and filming a few of the 531 Palestinian villages that were eradicated in 1948. The second documentary project that he began to work on during the summer of 2008 focused on the Palestinian Folkloric Dance troupe Wishah. Under the direction of the renowned choreographer Mohammed Abu Atta, Wishah’s aesthetics combines traditional folk dance forms with modern dance and non-verbal theatrical narratives to express aspects of the complex personal and collective existence of the Palestinians. Their art bridges the shattered past of Palestinian culture with the tragic present of life under occupation and reaches for the desired future of peaceful existence. He plans to continue recording interviews with Mohammed Abu Atta as well as several members of the troupe. If the opportunity permits during my trip, he will also film one or more of their performances. This film is part of a larger series of documentaries that explore the diversity of contemporary Palestinian Art. He is currently in the process of completing the second film in that series (focusing on the artwork of the sculptor Rana Bishara) and plan to have the third film (exploring the artwork of the photographer Rula Halawani) completed before he returns to Palestine during the summer of 2009.

Jerome Lynne Hall, Ph.D.
ISRAEL
Chemistry and Biochemistry

The purpose of travel to Israel wa to finalize ongoing research on a 1st-century CE boat extracted from the Yam Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) in 1986.The final documentation includes mapping the exterior hull (including planking and fastener patterns) for final publication. This will allow the final phase of the computer-aided design (CAD) rendering of the vessel interior and exterior.

Belinda Lum, Ph.D.
PANAMA
Sociology
The main purpose of this study was to conduct qualitative and quantitative measurement of social and cultural attitudes towards individuals possessing a skill set associated with new communication technologies, including subsequent assessment of sociological norms and the impact on local communication patterns both within and between native and expatriate US populations. A secondary purpose was to foster increased collaborative linkages between both USD and the Universidad Tecnologica de Panama, with the potential opportunity of building an international service-learning immersion trip associated with the nonprofit institution Impacto Foundation.

Alejandro Meter, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
Languages and Literature

After more than a century of Jewish presence in the history, cultures and societies of Latin America, and following the comings and goings, being and living within and without a hyphenated identity of Jews in those contexts, the question of exclusiveness and marginality concerning the Jewish communities of Latin America should be reevaluated. In the era of multidirectional universalism, hybridism and cross-border transnational linguistic and socio-cultural migrations, is it still relevant to discuss such notions as otherness and exclusion with regard to Latin-American Jews and/or Jewish Latin-Americans? This workshop proposes to reexamine some of the prevalent paradigms in the area of Latin American Jewish studies from an interdisciplinary standpoint, comprising history, literature, cinematography, sociology and psychology, and from distinct new perspectives elaborated recently in Latin America, the United States and Israel.

Lance Nelson, Ph.D.
INDIA
Theology and Religious Studies

As part of an ongoing research agenda on the connections between religion and environmental awareness in Hinduism, and also in preparation for a topics course Dr. Nelson is preparing on the “Past and Future of Gandhian Non-violence in India,” he visited Bali, Indonesia, to attend and present at a conference in Bali, Indonesia, entitled Waters in South and Southeast Asia: Interaction of Culture and Religion. The conference is sponsored by the South and Southeast Asian Association for the Study of Culture and Religion and was held at the Universitas Hindu Indonesia in Denpasar. Connected with the conference were guided tours of religious sites in Bali and Java.  Dr. Nelson then went on to India to visit several ecological and social-justice activist organizations in India inspired by Gandhian ideals. These would include Manav Sadhna, is an NGO based at Gandhi Ashram in Ahmedabad, Gujarat; the Sadhu Vaswani Mission in Pune, Maharashtra; the Center for Science and the Environment in New Delhi, and the Eco Ashram in Rishikesh, Uttar Pradesh. The purpose was to interview participants and gather literature (often unavailable in libraries in North America) for an article on the continuing relevance of Gandhianism in India and for course preparation.

Noelle Norton, Ph.D.
UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE & LUXEMBOURG
Political Science

The purpose of this travel was to collect data and conduct interviews with both legislators and scholars about policy-making efforts and voting behavior on international women’s rights policy for a comparative analysis of the handling of global gender issues in three democratic assemblies: the British Parliament, the European Parliament, and the United States Congress. This project extended Dr. Norton's past publication record and current work on congressional handling of domestic women’s issues in the U.S. Congress to include a more valuable comparative analysis. Currently, there is little research, if any, on how democratic legislatures handle international women’s rights policy. Analysis of the support for international women’s issues will help us understand the role both male and female legislators play in global human rights and the shape and scope of state feminism in three unique assemblies. her intent is to present this research at the American Political Science Association conference in September 2009 and to complete a manuscript on legislative handling of international women’s right issues within the next year.

Clara Oberle, Ph.D.
GREECE
History

The premise of the conference is that though different European countries have taken different paths in responding to the problems of illness, homelessness, and poverty, there have been moments in history in which all of Europe mobilized and even cooperated in search for answers to these shared problems. The expressed intention of the conveners is to allow conference participants to examine direct connections between different European countries in their respective formulation of welfare policies. This will lead to further collaboration and possibly publications. The conference allowed Dr. Oberle to internationalize her understanding of welfare policies in twentieth-century Europe. This will be crucialfor her own research and book manuscript on immediate postwar Berlin which she would like to expand so as to address common issues faced by war-ravaged cities elsewhere in Europe in 1945. Shared concerns were severe housing crises and the movements of refugees across national borders.

Amanda Petersen, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
Languages and Literature

Dr. Petersen read a paper at the XXVIII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association, LASA 2009: Rethinking inequalities in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She participated in a panel entitled “Mujer: Violencias de la desigualdad” by reading the paper, “Present Absence in Cristina Pacheco's Short Fiction”. This paper is part of a larger project on gender and violence in contemporary Mexican narrative by female authors.

Patricia Plovanich, Ph.D.
GERMANY
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Plovanich teaches the upper-division theology course, “Catholicism in the United States” every fall. It is a popular topic with students and provides her many opportunities to explore the experiential and documentary history ofAmerican Catholicism from the viewpoint of life in the American West. The story viewed from this perspective yields a different viewpoint from publications by professors from theNortheast and Midwest. This perspective also differs radically from the impressions Germans have of American Catholicism. Presenting the paper in Eichstaett certainly brings such a perspective to Germanyunder the name of the University of San Diego. The potential for publication of a briefer version of the paper in “Stimmen der Zeit”, a Jesuit journal published out of Munich, is high (as they have featured more than a few articles about the American Church.

David Shirk, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
Political Science

Dr. Shirk travel to Brazil has provided him with invaluable insights for his teaching students interested in Latin America. Dr. Shirk has the opportunity to enhance and expand his scholarly research on democratization, public security, and the rule of law. His LASA conference paper will focus on the reform package passed by the Mexican Congress in 2008, which will introduce new features that proponents believe will modernize the justice system by bringing greater efficiency, effectiveness, transparency, and fairness to the administration of justice. The paper will draw on data, lessons, and experiences from the Justice in Mexico Project (www.justiceinmexico.org), and will benefit from exchange and feedback from his colleagues and fellow panelists working on these same issues in Brazil and Argentina (and insights from other conference panels). After the conference, he will submit his paper to a peer reviewed journal. Hence, this conference represents an opportunity to enhance his knowledge of Latin America and disseminate significant, policy-relevant research based at USD.

Leonora Simonovis, Ph.D.

VENEZUELA
Languages and Literature

Dr. Simonovis' paper addresses issues of race and class in contemporary Venezuelan hip-hop music. This type of music connects with its counterpart in the US, but presents some interesting variations that evolve from the salsa musical tradition and that portrays itself as a political manifest for marginalized classes that find a way to voice their concerns through music. Next semester she will be teaching a class on the Literature and Culture of the Hispanic Caribbean, and will analyze the content of some of these songs and compare them to the hip-hop genre in the US. She believes that music and popular culture are doorways that give access to different cultures because they portray everyday life, but also frame the context for historical, social, and political analysis of the various communities that inhabit a certain place. The particular musical group that she will be working on has taken it upon itself to voice the concerns of the millions of inhabitants that live in the slums of Caracas. They, themselves, grew up in one of these cerros, as they are commonly called, and so people can identify with their music because it speaks from, and of, that common experience. Her theoretical framework is based on the concept of cannibalization. She believes that Latin American hip-hop in general cannibalizes American hip-hop and transforms it into a cultural product that speaks about the reality of the continent, thus turning, not into a form of de-colonization, but into a discourse that has political, racial, and class connotations, and whose contents vary according to the society to which it belongs.

Monica Stufft, Ph.D.
CROATIA
Theatre Arts and Performance Studies

The purpose of Dr. Stufft's trip was an intensive week of collaboration with two colleagues on two interrelated projects as part of the Performance Studies international (PSi) Performance and Pedagogy Subcommittee. The first project was to spend two days planning and organizing two three-hour shifts for the upcoming PSi conference in Zagreb, Croatia with Dr. Joe Zelleher and Dr. Rachel Fensham. These shifts involved most conference participants (approximately 500 in attendance from at least 25 countries) and was designed to investigate intersections of performance and pedagogy in the field of Performance Studies through a series of performative events. The second project, a manuscript, was drawn in part from the materials generated at the conference in addition to other sources. Dr. Fensham and Dr. Stufft are co-editing the text; five of the seven days will be spent working with her on this project.

Randy Willoughby, Ph.D.
NEW ZEALAND
Political Science

The purpose of the travel was to present the paper to the Wellington Conference on Contemporary China. Dr. Willoughby's project title is "Chinese and French Institutions and the New Nuclear Order."Dr. Willoughby has been working on a comparative study of the twilight zone between nuclear weapons and nuclear power focusing on France and China. He presented his work on this second project at the Wellington Conference.  Since his research agenda coincides fully with his teaching agenda, working on these projects will help him advance my career long teaching ambition of moving from a one dimensional European specialist, to a multidimensional analyst with uneven expertise across various regions, to a Comparative analyst equally comfortable in several regions of the world.

Fall 2008

Michael Agnew, Ph.D.
NORTHERN IRELAND & SPAIN
Languages and Literatures

The purpose for Dr. Agnew's travel was to do primary-source research for scholarly a presentation in Belfast and to write a subsequent article on Pablo de Santa María. Dr Agnew also conducted primary-source research for his book project, "Figures of the Historian in Fifteenth-

Michelle Camacho, Ph.D.
MEXICO
Sociology

The purpose of Dr. Camacho's travels was to conduct research for her manuscript, The Paradox of Paradise: Tourism as Economic Development, specifically to collecting qualitative and quantitative data, and performing archival research.

Alana Cordy-Collins, Ph.D.
FINLAND
Anthropology

The purpose of Dr. Cordy-Collins' travels was to meet and learn about the Saami, indigenous reindeer herding people of the western Polar Region, and to conduct Saami research in the Arktikum Museum, Rovanieme, Finland. She then traveled to Copenhagen, Denmark to present a research paper at meetings at the European Paleopathlogy Association. The conference put her in proximity to do museum and field research about the Saami, the indigenous people of Lapland.  Comparative reading and discussions has led her to hypothesize that shamanism originated in the arctic conditions of the last Ice Age, and has been maintained by cultures still living in ice age conditions—the Circum-Polar peoples.

Bahar Davary, Ph.D.
IRAN
Theology and Religious Studies

While in Iran, Dr. Davary continued her research titled, "Contemporary Women’s Movement in Iran: The establishment of Religious School for Women in Isfahan and Qum." This research focuses on women’s religious school and their curriculum. The formation of these religious schools for women as a gateway to official entry into the realm of –authoritative- engagement with classical textual Islam has yet to be explored. For this reason, Dr. Davary finds it important to conduct research on the curriculum of the school in Isfahan and at howzeye elmi’ye khwaharan (seminary for women, established in 1985) in Qom.

Mary Doak, Ph.D.
FRANCE
Theology and Religious Studies

The purpose of the trip is for Dr. Doak to participate in an international gathering of theologians from Europe, Canada, the United States, and Mexico at the International Theological Conference on “Creative Theology for an Age of Globalization” to present current research on the challenges and opportunities globalization presents to contemporary Christian theology.

Florence Gillman, Ph.D.
CHINA
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Gillman conducted research and interviews at the library and study centre of Holy Spirit Seminary in Hong Kong. She also extended her current Chinese contacts by visiting institutions that teach biblical studies or theology in Macau and/or Taiwan. The specific article she worked on regarding this research will deal with her observations as an American teaching biblical studies to Catholic students in Hong Kong.

Peter Gratton, Ph.D.
AUSTRALIA
Philosophy

Dr. Peter Gratton presented papers at two conferences. For the first conference, he not only presented a paper, but also organized a panel of international scholars on the work of the philosopher, Jacques Derrida, at the International Association for Philosophy and Literature. He was also asked to be an on-site coordinator to help set up the conference before it began. The title of the paper he presented is, "Derrida's Thought on Globalization and the Possibility of Local Knowledge." Dr. Gratton organized the scholars from France, Austria, the UK, and Australia. He also presented a paper called, "Just Violence and the Violence of Metaphysics" at the Derrida Today International Conference in Sydney, Australia.

Sarah Gray, Ph.D.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
Marine Science & Environmental Studies

Dr. Gray continued her field work started in August 2007 to collect sediment samples and oceanographic data, and to meet with researchers in the Virgin Islands to work on joint research proposals for funding this research program. She established a long-term ongoing program of collaborative research, education and outreach in partnership with researchers at the University of the Virgin Islands and local non-profit environmental organizations.

Vidya Nadkarni, Ph.D.
SLOVENIA
Political Science

The purpose of Dr. Nadkarni's travel was to conduct research for her book titled, Handbook of the Politics of Central Asia. The time period covered in the handbook is contemporary, with a focus on the dynamics and causes behind current issues in the region—it is not intended to be a historical treatment, but rather a work centered on internal and regional political issues, as well as the geopolitics affecting the stability and international role of Central Asia. Central Asia will be considered to consist of the five former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan.

Kenneth Serbin, Ph.D.
BRAZIL
History

During Dr. Serbin's travels to Brazil (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Brasília) he launched the Brazilian edition of his award-winning book Needs of the Heart: A Social and Cultural History of Brazil’s Clergy and Seminaries (University of Notre Dame Press, 2006). In Brazil the Portuguese translation of the book was published as Padres, Celibato e Conflito Social (Priests, Celibacy, and Social Conflict) by Companhia das Letras, Brazil’s top commercial publisher. Dr Serbin did a week-long book tour with book signings; radio, television, and newspaper interviews; and talks before academic audiences and at the headquarters of the National Conference of Brazilian Bishops in Brasília. He also joined fellow officers of the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) to meet with Brazilian officials for two days to help plan the Tenth International Conference, scheduled for July 2010 in Brasília.

Zhi-Yong Yin, Ph.D.
EGYPT
Marine Science & Environmental Studies

The purpose of Dr. Yin's trip was to conduct fieldwork to investigate the impact of recent urban development on archaeological sites. Dr. Yin and colleagues submitted a proposal to the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) and this served as a pilot study. Because of the rapid pace of urban development along the Red Sea coastal region of Egypt, there has been little attempt by scholars to assess the impact of urbanization and land use change on the natural environment and cultural heritage sites in this area. Dr. Yin would like to conduct a preliminary impact assessment and archaeological field survey of Hurghada and Quseir, and the area in between. Of particular concern is the rate of urban encroachment on identified (as well as potentially unidentified) archaeological sites, including the Ottoman fort at Quseir and the ancient city, now an archaeological park. This project showcased how geographic information systems and remote sensing technologies can be used in social sciences. The data obtained from this study will be available for students to use in classes at USD.

Spring 2008

James Bolender, Ph.D.
UGANDA
Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Bolender traveled to Uganda  to establish and conduct the environmental monitoring in and around the site of a Children’s Malaria Hospital in Mbarara. This project was in conjunction with Dr. Anita Hunter (Hahn School of Nursing) and Dr. Patricia Vasquez (School of Business) to assist the Archdiocese of Mbarara and the Holy Innocents Foundation in the establishment of this hospital. The establishment of the Children’s Malaria Hospital in Mbarara, Uganda is an interdisciplinary and multi-dimensional undertaking that spans the Archdiocese of Mbarara, the Holy Innocents Foundation (an NGO), and three schools from the University of San Diego.  This undertaking was initiated by Dr. Anita Hunter of the Hahn School of Nursing to assist the Archdiocese and the Holy Innocents Foundation, and has expanded to include faculty and graduate students from the School of Business and faculty (Drs. Bolender and Boudrias) and undergraduate students from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Alana Cordy-Collins, Ph.D.
EASTER ISLAND
Anthropology

The proposed research began on Easter Island, focusing on stone carving technology and petroglyphic iconography. The goal was to produce a digital photographic database of both categories to compare with mainland prehistoric examples, such as Inka stone masonry from the Cuzco region. Dr. Cordy-Collins followed a similar approach in the Galapagos, first by photographing artifact collections, mainly of ceramic wares in museums, that she could compare to a photo database of north-coast mainland Peruvian-Ecuadorian pottery that she has compiled over the last three decades. She envisions the proposed research as the first stage in a larger, on-going investigative program that she hopes will lead to student collaboration.

Kevin Guerrieri, Ph.D.
PERU & CANADA
Languages and Literatures

Dr. Guerrieri attended and presented papers at two international conferences: the VII Congreso Internacional de Literatura Hispánica in Cusco, Perú and the Canadian Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CALACS) Congress in Vancouver, BC). I will be presenting two different papers on works that form a part of my current primary research project, a book-length study on the contemporary Colombian novel.  This study focuses on the interrelation of three major topics in the contemporary Colombian novel as they are expressed in narratives situated in major urban centers:  displacement, configurations of urban space, and subject formation.  In addition to the introduction and conclusion, the book is organized into four main chapters, each centered on a different city:  Paris, Madrid/Barcelona, New York, and Bogotá.  In each chapter two or three novels published within the last two decades are analyzed in depth in the context of their spatial transnational contexts--with exception to the final chapter, which turns the study back to Colombia's capital city and the topic of internal displacement.  In conjunction with this spatial approach, the analyses are placed in dialogue diachronically with previous Colombian and Latin American novelistic production in general as it relates to the indicated urban centers.  In this sense, the project combines two overall approaches, mapping both time and space, in the analysis of the aforementioned topics.  For the two conference papers included in this grant proposal, Dr. Guerrieri will be focusing on works by Laura Restrepo, Arturo Alape, Fernando Vallejo, and Héctor Abad Faciolince.

John Halaka, MFA
ISRAEL & PALESTINE
Art

Dr. Halaka is currently in the process of developing a series of documentary films that underscore the intersection of personal, cultural and political identity in the production of contemporary Palestinian art. He plans to return to Palestine and Israel to continue research in contemporary Palestinian art and to interview an additional group of artists.

Jerome Lynne Hall, Ph.D.
ISRAEL
Chemistry and Biochemistry

The purpose of travel to Israel was to finalize ongoing research on a 1st-century CE boat extracted from the Yam Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) in 1986. The Dr. Hall has spent a total of nine months at the site documenting the hull of this vessel for a final publication scheduled to go to press in 2011. Specifically, requested monies were used to travel to Kibbutz Nof Ginosar on the western Galilee and remain there for a period of two weeks in order to finalize measurements in the after section (stern) of the Kinneret Boat and to photograph the vessel for final publication.

Joseph Jeon, Ph.D.
KOREA
English

The purpose of travel for Dr. Jeon was to conduct Archival Research at the Korean Film Archive for his novel, Scenes from the Uninhabited Present: Korean Film at the End of History, which examines the recent boom in South Korean Cinema in the context of the traumatizing 20th-century history of the nation. Arising in a context of occupation by Japan and then by the United States as well as a bloody war that divided the country, both geographically and ideologically, modern Korean history is often defined as traumatic. In the recent films he has examined, however, the trope of forgetting becomes increasingly prominent, which fundamentally conflicts with the narratives of trauma that pervade the nation. Dr. Jeon has already published the first chapter of the book in the major journal in his field and this grant will help fuel the momentum generated toward the completion of the manuscript. At USD, this research will enrich his current class in Asian American literature as well as open avenues for new classes on the topic in the English Department.

Vidya Nadkarni, Ph.D.
Political Science

The purpose of Dr. Nadkarni's travel iwa to present a paper at the Eighth International CISS Millennium Conference on Global Conflict, Cooperation, and Integration in Paris, France. She is currently working on a book project on Strategic Partnerships in Eurasia and has completed three chapters of this book.  This section of her project sought to examine the potential or lack thereof for the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) led by India, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) led by China and secondarily Russia, and the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) led by Russia to serve as springboards for the realization of a cooperative vision of Asian and Eurasian security.  These organizations together cover the regions of Central and South Asia and Eurasia.  This examination forms part of a larger study examining the moves of major powers in the Asian/Eurasian region—China, India, and Russia—to forge strategic partnerships with each other and to meet in trilateral forums to discuss common positions on issues of international import. 

Rodney G. Peffer, Ph.D.
SOUTH KOREA
Philosophy

The purpose of Dr. Peffer's trip was to participate in the XXII World Congress of Philosophy in Seoul, South Korea and, subsequently, to undertake a three-week lecture tour of major universities (and Academies of Social Science and Philosophy) in China. For the upcoming XXII Congress, Dr. Peffer will present on "Rawlsian Theory, Critical Theory, and Global Justice," "Socialism & Democracy: Socialist Political Philosophy Today" and “Just War Theory and Contemporary Military Conflicts.”

Yi Sun, Ph.D.
CHINA
History

Dr. Sun's purpose for traveling to China was to attend the First International Conference of Chinese Historians in Shanghai. She has been invited to present her paper, “Ironies of Modernization: The Resurgence of Confucian Influence in the Lives of Chinese Women in the Reform Era,” which is based on an ongoing study of the changing experiences of Chinese women. The paper that she presented at the conference is based on extensive research that has been conducted over the last few years, and is part of a larger project on the study of the changing experiences of Chinese women.  The multidisciplinary conference, which was attended by many scholars in the field of women’s studies, including a number of internationally renowned experts, provided an intellectually stimulating environment in which Dr. Yin was able to engage in scholarly exchange of ideas with colleagues from a variety of academic disciplines. 

Fall 2007

Cynthia Caywood, Ph.D.
UNITED KINGDOM
English

She delivered a paper at the Literary London Conference, held at the University of Westminster, London, UK. Presenting her ideas at an international conference allowed her to represent the University’s strong commitment to international education and scholarship. The presentation also was consistent with her university service work in support of international education, which includes serving as faculty advisor to USD study abroad semester programs in Oxford, UK and Cork, Ireland; originating and running the College’s “Summer in London” program; serving on and co-chairing the College’s Faculty Study Abroad Committee; and overseeing the College’s sponsored international programming.

Robert B. Fleming, Ph.D.
FRANCE
Theatre

Dr. Fleming researched interdisciplinary connections in performance and, ultimately, applied them in his own creative research project, LES VAURIENS, a solo piece about Malagasy poet Jean-Joseph Rabearivelo and the 2005 Clichy-sous-Bois riots. He attended the summer university gathering for invited members of this theatre collective and presented some of his work at the Centre International Artistique de Roy Hart (CIARH) with some of his fellow artists/collaborators with whom he began realizing the work in the summer of 2006. Finally, as suggested by the organizers of the Avignon and Off-Avignon Festivals, he attended these festivals to investigate presenting his work there in the summer of 2008 while watching some of the finest present day French avant-garde artists’ performances.

Sarah Gray, Ph.D.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
Marine Science

Dr. Gray conducted field work to collect sediment samples and oceanographic data, and also established contacts with educators, researchers, and environmental professionals in the Virgin Islands. Ultimately, she hopes this will be the first field season in a long-term ongoing program of collaborative research, education and outreach in partnership with researchers at the University of the Virgin Islands and local non-profit environmental organizations.

Michelle Jacob, Ph.D.
CANADA
Ethnic Studies

Dr. Jacob traveled to Vancouver, BC to collaborate with colleagues on a project which examined indigenous peoples’ methods of survival. Her team is attended and presented at the International Leadership Association’s 9th Annual Conference, entitled: Leadership: Impact, Culture, Sustainability. Dr. Jacob and her colleagues from across the Western Hemisphere attended the conference to carry out their work of collaborating on the project they have entitled: Teaching and Learning: Indigenous Perspectives on How to Survive and Thrive.

Stacy Langton, Ph.D.
GERMANY
Mathematics

Dr. Langton was invited to be one of 16 Euler scholars, from 9 countries, to participate in a workshop on the work of Leonhard Euler, sponsored by the Mathematics Research Institute at Oberwolfach, Germany.

Juliana Maxim, Ph.D.
ROMANIA
Art

Dr. Maxim presented a paper titled “The Paradoxes of a Communist Architectural History, Romania, 1960s” at the international conference titled History, Heritage, and Regeneration: The future of traditional architecture in Eastern Europe in Sibiu-Transylvania, Romania. The conference was sponsored by INTBAU, the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture, and Urbanism.

Alejandro Meter, Ph.D.
ARGENTINA
Languages and Literatures

Dr. Meter attended an NEH Seminar titled "Jewish Buenos Aires" and hosted by the University of Arizona. The seminar was taught by Prof. David William Foster (ASU), a distinguished professor in the field of Latin American Jewish studies. They met Monday through Friday for class and had the chance to work on one-on-one sessions with the director on their own research projects. In addition, twice a week, they were joined by several internationally acclaimed writers such as Ana María Shúa, Alicia Steimberg, Angélica Gorodischer, David Viñas, and Andrés Rivera. At the end of the seminar he delivered a paper and chaired a panel at the XIII International Conference of the Latin American Jewish Studies Association at the National Library in Buenos Aires. There, his book on memory and representation was presented, though the "official" presentation was in Rosario. And lastly, he traveled to the city of Rosario to present his recently published book on Jewish memory and representation at "Museo de la Memoria", a UNESCO sponsored institution with major national and international recognition.

Eric Pierson, Ph.D.
ENGLAND
Communication

Dr. Pierson’s trip had a two-fold propose: book research and course preparation. He is currently working on a book focusing on Blaxploitation film and wanted to include a chapter on the international reception of these films. While doing a phone interview with Gordon Parks, he mentioned with great pride the international success of his film Shaft. This took Dr. Pierson's thinking in a new and exciting direction. In all of his research on Blaxploitation he had seen no mention of international reception. During this trip he was able to access box-office data and local media writings about films of the period. The trip also allowed for course preparation in advance of a course that was taught in London in the summer of 2008. The hands-on focus of the course required that he make contacts with media scholars and professionals in advance of his arrival. He established contacts and began tour planning with individuals at Virgin Radio/Records, Pinewood Studios, the BBC, the London Times and at least two other media outlets.

Sandra Sgoutas-Emch, Ph.D.
CZECH REPUBLIC
Psychology

Dr. Sgoutas-Emch presented research at the European Congress of Psychology. She has attended the European Congress for the last 10 years and has had the opportunity to visit a variety of countries. She has used the knowledge she learned during the congress in several of her courses. She also has made it a point to travel around the countries to observe the different cultures, languages and customs. She uses these examples in her courses as examples of how people vary and the roll of culture on health. Helping students see the role of diversity and different health practices and beliefs is an important part of health psychology. Furthermore, she brought a student along to the conference so they may experience what psychology is like in Europe.

Zhi-Yong Yin, Ph.D.
CHINA & TIBET
Marine Sciences

Dr. Yin traveled to Beijing, northwestern China and the Tibetan Plateau to perform fieldwork to collecttree ring samples in order to study past climatic variations, with an emphasis on droughts. His team submitted a proposal to various interested U.S. agencies and organizations including NSF, NASA, and private foundations. The proposal focused on the spatial and temporal variation patterns of climate change in northwestern China, where water resources are of great concern to both local residents and government agencies.

Spring 2007

David De Haan, Ph.D.
MEXICO
Chemistry

Dr. De Haan chaired a session and presented in the area of his research at the American Geophysical Union Joint Assembly meeting Acapulco. The session title was “Aerosol and Cloud Chemistry: Mechanisms, Products, and Process Evaluation.” By chairing a session and presenting his work on the formation of smog haze at the most important conference in his field, held in Mexico for the first time, he made contacts with scientists and students in his field from both the U.S. and Mexico. Through these contacts, he was able to initiate scientific collaborations that address air pollution problems unique to Mexico, thus providing a service that supports the international mission of USD. Dr. De Haan has incorporated what he learned at the conference about Mexican perspectives on air pollution into enrichment activities in General Chemistry, and into lab experiences in Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry, and Instrumental Analysis.

Florence Gillman, Ph.D.
CHINA
Theology and Religious Studies

Dr. Gillman visited Hong Kong and gave a four day series of lectures at Holy Spirit Seminary there. Then, through arrangements with the Hong Kong based Institute for Sino-Christian Studies, she traveled to universities in Shanghai, Jinan, Beijing and other mainland cities to give lectures at those universities to Chinese humanists interested in biblical studies. In each of these cities she conducted interviews with colleagues and students concerning their interest in biblical studies.

Luby Liao, Ph.D.
TAIWAN
Mathematics and Computer Science

Dr. Liao gave a series of invited talks in universities on the topics of Enterprise Web development and Computer Science education at the following universities: Chaoyang University of Technology, Feng Chia University, National Chung Cheng University, Toko University and Nan-Hua University. Opportunities for international partnerships between these universities and USD were also explored.

Vidya Nadkarni, Ph.D.
PORTUGAL & GREECE
Political Science

Dr. Nadkarni presented papers at two conferences—the Comparative Interdisciplinary Studies Section (CISS) Millennium conference in Bucaco, Portugal and the 5th International Conference on Politics and International Affairs in Athens, Greece. At the CISS Millennium conference, she presented a paper examining the role of strategic partnerships among secondary powers in a unipolar world. At the Athens conference, she presented a paper entitled, “The Sino-Indian Strategic Partnership: Engaging or Hedging?”

Mark Woods, Ph.D.
INDIA
Philosophy

Dr. Wood's presented the paper “Environmental Justice, Nature Protection, and Sustainability: Debate and Reconciliation” at the Third International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic, and Social Sustainability at the University of Madras in Chennai, India. He also explored the possibility of setting up a University of San Diego (USD) study abroad program in southern India.

Fall 2006 Recipients

Alana Cordy-Collins, Ph.D.
GREECE
Anthropology

Dr. Cordy-Collins visited Cycladic archaeological sites, museums, archives as well as traveled to villages on the islands of Crete and Thera, and interacted with Cycladic people. She also attended an Anthropological Conference on the island of Thera.

Bahar Davary, Ph.D.
ENGLAND
Theology and Religious Studies

The purpose of this trip is to attend “Mashrootiat: The Iranian Constitutional Revolution 1906-1911” a conference at the Examination School, Oxford University. On the centenary of the Constitutional Revolution this conference addressed issues such as: the nature of the revolution? How it changed Iran? The role of imperialism? How lasting were the institutions established by the revolution? Its global influence? How it shaped the country’s future? Her current research interests focus on the significant role that religion played and continues to play in the unfolding events of past century of the Muslim world and more specifically, Iran and in shaping today’s politics. Attending the conference gave her the opportunity to engage with the latest research of the experts from various fields of the study who have been intellectually involved with this event and its global effects, and to engage in conversations that proved to be invigorating. As a result she has been thinking of proposing a course called "Who Rules?: Traditional and Contemporary Government in Islam," which would serve both Political science and Religious Studies in addressing issues of politics of the Muslim world with more insight on in-depth issues of religion.

Eric Jiang, Ph.D.
CHINA
Math and Computer Science

The purpose of his travel is to present his recent research work in the fields of computer intelligence and data mining at International Conference on Computational Intelligence (ICIC 06) in Kunming and International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR 06) in Hong Kong. These papers have been published by IEEE Computer Society and Springer’s Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences. Other goals of travel include exchanging ideas of computer science research and education with fellow colleagues from countries around the world and seeking international collaborations and undergraduate computer science research projects.

Hugh I. Ellis, Ph.D.
GERMANY
Biology

The purpose of travel is to present two papers at the 24th International Ornithological Congress. The titles of the papers are "Energy costs and food requirements of Eared Grebes during autumnal staging at Mono Lake" and "The relationship between basal metabolism and body composition: a different view." In addition, Dr. Ellis spent a large amount of time interacting with other avian scientists and learning many things that will be of use to me in all my courses. Finally, he spent time in several evolutionary biology talks, including a major address on molecular evolution, knowing that he would be able to use that information in all my courses.

Evelyn Kirkley, Ph.D.
THAILAND
Theology and Religious Studies

She will visit historic, cultural, religious, and humanitarian sires in northern Thailand led by Roger Harmon, former director of the Peace Corps in Thailand. She will also attend the International Society of Behavioral Medicine Conference in Bangkok. She plans to incorporate learning from this trip to two courses she regularly teaches: Gender and Religion and Christianity and its practice. She hopes to gain a deeper understanding of Asian History, culture, and family life as they relate to Thai Buddhism and how these cultural and gender norms shape the experiences of Asian immigrants to the United States. She is especially interested in the intersections (if any) between religion, the sex trade, and norms of femininity. She also hopes to understand the impact of Christian missions and evangelism in Thailand by visiting churches and speaking to Christians and non-Christians.

Karma Lekshe Tsomo, Ph.D.
LAOS
Theology and Religious Studies

The purpose of travel incorporates many different aspects. Video images taken while in Laos will be used to produce a video program on the contemporary practice of Theravada Buddhism in Laos for use in the classroom. Also, digital images of Buddhist practice in Laos will be used to create a PowerPoint slide show to present in the classroom and the USD community. Research data gathered in Laos will be woven into classroom lectures, especially information on funerary rituals, women’s roles, and the interface between Buddhism and politics. Information gathered will inform class excursions to Wat Boupharam, a Laotian temple in San Diego, where students conduct field research. Research data will be used to complete a scholarly article for publication, titled “View from the Margins: Buddhist Women and Religious Authority in Laos.”