Spring 2019 Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions Spring 2019

FYW 110: Preparation for College Writing

Deborah Sundmacher

Formerly English 110: Intro to College Writing for ESL Students.
A writing class designed for non-native speakers of English to prepare them take FYW 150.  Instruction in fundamentals of various modes of written expression, including English grammar, sentence structure, understanding the importance of audience, editing and revision.  Readings are selected from both non-fiction and fiction prose.  Students are required to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors.
Preparation course for FYW 150

 

English 121: Composition and Literature

Dennis Clausen, & Staff

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division written literacy for students entering USD before the Fall of 2017. Practice in developing skills of close observation, investigation, critical analysis, and informed judgment in response to literary texts.  Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer tutors. 

FYW 150: First Year Writing

Various Professors

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division written literacy for students entering USD in or after the Fall of 2017. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process for writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed and trained by peer-tutors.
Must be taken in the first year. 

English 215: Children's Literature - CRN 2668

Lisa Smith, MWF 1:25-2:20pm

Formerly English 231. 
Literary and popular texts produced for children. Emphasis on analysis of how children's texts construct gender, sex, race, class, family structure, power relations, and violence, for example. Includes phonemic awareness, word analysis, and field experience. Reserved for students in credential programs.

For Liberal Studies majors.

English 220-01: Theatre Alive - CRN 2669

Cynthia Caywood, TR 7:45-9:05am

“Theatre Alive!” focuses on Western drama.  From the dark tragedies of the Greek stage to the brilliant outpourings of Shakespeare, from the innovative energy of American musicals to the daring work of England’s National Theatre, drama has given voice to the complexities, miseries and miracles of the human experience. Because plays are meant to be seen, not simply read, the course also focuses on the principles of staging, and work is linked to productions as much as possible, both live and on film. Possible texts:  Kushner, Angels in America; Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Nottage, Sweat; Sondheim, Sweeney Todd; Hwang, M Butterfly; Wilder, Our Town; Washburn, Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play; Euripides, Medea; and others.

English 220 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 220H-02: Voice & Text - CRN 3840

Fred Robinson, TR 4:00-5:20pm

We will study literature, not only as something written, but as something voiced.  Students will read poetry, drama and stories with the purpose of 1) writing about the voices we hear in them, and 2) rehearsing and performing recitations of them in front of the class (no memorization required).  When we read we hear a voice speaking the text inside our heads; our work is to make that voice interesting.  When that happens, the meaning of the text is richer, less abstract, more felt, more pleasurable. Literature becomes an embodied experience.  Workload: 3 essays, 3 graded recitations, 1 final recitation, selected from the three previous, in front of a public audience.

Section 2 is Honors only. English 220 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-01 & -02: From Realism to Rap: 20th Century American Poetry - CRNs 2670 & 2671

Deniz Perin-Coombs, MWF 8:00-8:55am & 9:05-10:00am

Whether or not we realize it, poetry is finely woven into the fabric of our lives. From prayer to song, and in between, it is often through poetry that we grow into and come to terms with life’s many trials and rewards. This course will explore the work of 20th century American poets, as well as some contemporary artists. We will read and discuss a wide range of works, starting with realist Robert Frost at the beginning of the 20th century, through to subsequent literary movements and artists spanning the last 100 years, including those who make use of oral forms, such as spoken word poets and musicians. Writing will include analytical, personal, and creative responses to the material.

English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

 

English 226-03 & -04: Romanticism & Revolution - CRNs 2672 & 2673

Ivan Ortiz, TR 10:45am-12:05pm & 2:30-3:50pm

In the years that witnessed the beginning of the French Revolution, English poet William Wordsworth rejoiced in the excitement of the times: “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive,/But to be young was very heaven!” The young enthusiasm of Wordsworth’s poetry is representative of the age known as Romanticism, a period of profound political, social, and scientific change in early nineteenth-century Europe. This course will introduce students to English Romantic literature in the context of revolution. By reading Romantic texts, we will think about the power of art and literature to promote social and political change. At the same time, we will consider different kinds of literature—poetry, novels, essays, plays and political pamphlets—promote change in unique ways. Issues we will explore include revolution, terrorism, slavery, poverty, women’s rights, education, industrialization, science and technology, and environmentalism.

Section 80 is LLC only. English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-05: Graphic Novels - CRN 2941

Jason Crum, MWF 10:10-11:05am

The course is a survey of the emerging genre of graphic novels. We will analyze the ways in which graphic novelists use and manipulate historical and contemporary social issues in their literature, and we will trace the rise of the graphic novel from its early use to its current manifestations. Our readings will be grounded in such theoretical perspectives as cultural studies, visual culture theory, poststructuralism, and postmodernism. Students will work critically and creatively with the material to consider the oftentimes contradictory ways in which popular culture struggles with difference, class, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, & sexuality. We will read such works as Alan Moore’s Watchmen, Grant Morrison’s Arkham Asylum, Marjane Satrapi’s Perespolis, Robert Kirkman’s The Walking Dead, Shaun Tan’s The Arrival, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Craig Thompson’s Blankets, Joe Sacco’s Safe Area Gorazde, Rutu Modan’s Exit Wounds, Tsugumi Ohba’s Death Note (manga & anime), and Charles Burns’ Black Hole. Additionally, we will read substantial critical and theoretical material, including works from Mikhail Bakhtin, Michel Foucault, Scott McCloud, Fredric Jameson, Adrienne Rich, Judith Jack Halberstam, and Raymond Williams. Assignments will include both critical essays and creative collaborations.

English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-06: Ghosts, Golems, & Gothic - CRN 3841

Lisa Hemminger, MWF 1:25-2:20pm

A study of texts that feature “other-worldly” creatures and beings. Throughout history, a good ghost or monster story has positively influenced individual readers and cultures, helping them identify and overcome fear. The craft of artists that provide other worlds can also help readers discern effective passages of description, setting, tone, and conflict. We will examine a variety of texts including books, short stories, comics, graphic novels, internet urban legends, and short film. Works from Stephen King, Henry James, Guillermo del Toro, H.P. Lovecraft, and David Wong.

English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-07: Science Fiction - CRN 3842

Adam Veal, TR 7:00-8:20pm

Sometimes you might find yourself thinking, “what am I doing here?”  Or you might ask yourself, “why am I here?”  This class will think about one response such a question:  “To explore strange new worlds.  To seek out new life and new civilizations.  To boldly go where no one has gone before.”  This class will be about exploring new worlds, whether in outer space, inner space, or virtual space.  As we meet new life and new civilizations, we’ll reflect on the meaning of our own lives and our own homes.  We’ll read stories that take these ideas very seriously, and we’ll also read stories that poke a whole lot of fun at humanity and our hubris.   
English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor. 

English 226-08: Love, Sex, and Science - CRN 3843

Joanne Spiegel, TR 2:30-3:50pm

Love makes the world go around, if we are to believe the song lyrics.  Even a cursory look at commercials, movies, music videos, personal ads, and happy couples strolling hand in hand around campus seems to confirm the truth of this. Not to mention that poets, novelists, and playwrights have devoted plenty of ink to the subject.  This class will explore the nature of romantic love. Through the literature we read together we will focus on how love has been perceived during different time periods. Our readings will lay a foundation for one of the central questions of the course: Is love an unchanging, essentially biological phenomenon or do factors like culture and historical era determine how we define and experience love?  With an eye toward exploring that question, we’ll begin with the Greeks who attempted to come to terms with love by creating a god who both represented and controlled this mysterious phenomenon.  We’ll move forward from there exploring a treasure trove of literature spanning over 2500 years and several languages. Along the way we will also take time to listen to contemporary love songs and discuss romantic comedies on film. We’ll end the course with a scientific reading on love, which will raise interesting questions: Is love simply about dopamine and brain chemicals? If so, what’s the difference between sexual chemistry and love?  Between “hooking up” with someone and that “can’t get you off of my mind” feeling?  Is romantic love simply a dressed up version of sexual attraction?  A trick evolution plays on us to encourage us to reproduce?  These are just some of the provocative questions we’ll be discussing as we explore the relationships between love, sex, and science.

English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-80: Philosophy and Literature of Love - CRN 2808

Malachi Black, MW 4:00-5:20pm

As much an idea as it is an emotion, love has long been one of western civilization’s central preoccupations.  But what is love, and what does it mean?  From the earliest philosophers to the latest scientists and a multitude of writers in between, human beings have indefatigably sought to measure, define, taxonomy, and analyze the powerful if seemingly indescribable force of love.  In this course, we will both evaluate and contribute to that preexisting discourse.  In light of the highly interdisciplinary nature of our endeavor, we will accomplish a variety of distinct but correlated objectives.  While this is in part a writing class, we will also encounter, interrogate, and analyze competing views of love through the lenses of literature, history, philosophy, psychology, physiology, and sociobiology.  Along the way, we will crystallize and articulate the origins and evolution of notions of love from Plato’s Greece to contemporary America; internalize, critique, and appraise the chief love-related contributions of Greco-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern societies; and, complementarily, generate original (but not necessarily unprecedented) perspectives on the nature, significance, and substance of love through creative dialogues, stories and/or poems, and a final essay or “treatise.”

Section 80 is LLC only. English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-81: American Film, 1946-1979 - CRN 2809

Joseph McGowan, MW 2:30-3:50pm

The chronological span ranges from Howard Hawks’ The Big Sleep to Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, or from the film noir era to the ‘auteur’ era of the 70s. This course is a third segment in a sequence of film history offerings, following on from ‘The Silent Era’ and ‘From Talkies to Technicolor,’ though covering a much less definable era in terms of film-making style, narrative, and the battles between actor, director, producer, and studio. Films to be viewed may include: Notorious (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1946), Outrage (dir. Ida Lupino, 1950), Johnny Guitar (dir. Nicholas Ray, 1954), Dr. Strangelove and Barry Lyndon (dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1964 and 1975), Dog Day Afternoon (dir. Sidney Lumet, 1975), Rollerball (dir. Norman Jewison, 1975).

Section 81 is LLC only. English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 226-82: Nature Quests - CRN 2674

Bradley Melekian, TR 9:15-10:35am

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What role has the natural world traditionally played in identity formation (i.e. in the case of Thoreau)? What states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh and uncaring natural environment force contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Robyn Davidson’s Tracks.

Section 82 is LLC only. English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 230-01 & -02: Dark Matters: Science Fiction by Black Writers - CRNs 2675 & 2676

Carlton Floyd, TR 4:00-5:20pm & 5:30-6:50pm

Ranging from the first science fiction novel by a black identified writer, Black No More, by George Schuyler, to more recent entries in the genre from Octavia Butler, such as Fledgling, this course will explore these contributions to literature, with an eye toward their insightful observations concerning US culture.

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 230-03: U.S. Lit: African-American Freedom Dreams - CRN 2677

Mychal Odom, TR 4:00-5:20pm

In this course, we will examine the role of literature and cultural production in the creation of tradition protest that linked African American civil rights struggles with the antiapartheid struggles in Southern Africa.  In both a comparative and relational method, we will examine the influence and intertextual role African American writers had on African literature and vice versa. The course begins with the Harlem Renaissance and New Negro Movement in the US and its constituent Sophiatown Renaissance and New African Movement in South Africa and moves to contemporary links between African and African American writing of the Hip Hop generation (post-1960s).

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 230-04: U.S. Lit: Migration Stories - CRN 2678

Gail Perez, MW 2:30-3:50pm

Migration covers movements within nation states and also on a global level. There are currently 65 million refugees, 200 million migrant workers and also potentially 150 million climate change migrants in the future.  We will consider literature that emerges from not only immigration but also the global movements of peoples that are as old as humanity itself.  Internal migrations in the US include the Trail of Tears, the Dustbowl, and the Great Migration of African American people out of the South.  Global worker migration includes the millions of Filipinas/os who work abroad and others.  Potential authors include Mia Alvar, John Steinbeck, Langston Hughes, Reyna Grande, Diane Glancy, Brian Roley.

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 230-05 & -06: Bodies of Knowledge: Representations of Bodies in U.S. Literature - CRNs 2679 & 3844

Rachel Oriol, MW 4:00-5:20pm & 7:00-8:20pm

Literary representations of bodies are fundamental to understanding the way knowledge is created, archived, and passed on. In this course we will investigate writings by Nella Larsen, Cormac McCarthy, Ana Castillo, and Carmen Maria Machado (among others) that use bodies to engage in themes like disability, beauty, gender, death, and race. We will study how language about bodies contributes to social and historical knowledge of who is – and who is not – allowed to belong in the United States.

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 230-07: Literature in Violent Times - CRN 4400

Irene Williams, TR 10:45am-12:05pm

This is a course in U.S. literature.  We will be reading, studying, writing about, and discussing novels, stories, essays, and plays. Likely authors include Douglass, Whitman, Faulkner, Baldwin, Gilpin Faust, Rankine, others.  Course is conducted seminar style.  Independent thinkers welcome.
English 236 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor. Attributes: ELTI & FDD1.   

 

English 236-01 & -02: Intro to East Asian Cinema - CRNs 2680 & 2681

Koonyong Kim, TR 4:00-5:20pm & 5:30-6:50pm

This course serves as an introduction to the prismatic world of contemporary cinema from East Asia—China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. We will closely analyze a wide range of filmic texts in the context of the emergence of this region as a vibrant site of social, economic, and cultural (trans)formations in the age of globalization. As we critically engage with influential film-makers and their films, we will place particular emphasis on East Asian cinema’s unique styles, genres, and traditions. In doing so, we will seek to understand film as a distinctively multilayered and nuanced mode of storytelling. Directors to be examined include highly acclaimed auteurs such as Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, Miyazaki Hayao, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-wai, Jia Zhang-ke, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Park Chan-wook, and Kim Ki-duk.

English 236 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 240-01: Shakespeare - CRN 3847

Jeanie Grant Moore, MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

Formerly English 280.

Shakespeare 240 is part of the LLC Collaborate theme, which focuses on civic engagement. The event of a play actually creates civic engagement, since in a public gathering theatre may do much more than entertain: it often presents relevant cultural concerns and challenges the status quo of the dominant society. Shakespeare’s plays, comic or tragic, nearly always stage significant social issues that remain significant problems in present-day society. For example in Much Ado About Nothing, the false accusation of one young woman affects her, her relationship, her family, and her whole community. We will ask the question, “To what extent does placing unwarranted blame on a female still exist today, in what forms, and to what effect on our society as a whole”?  Also, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice presents a view of a prejudiced social order that ghettoized Jews and sometimes demonized them. The recent novel by Howard Jacobson, Shylock is My Name, brings these issues into a 21st-century setting, where Antisemitism still exists. Looking at these and other plays in their own historical context will provide some interesting parallels with our present-day social order.

Section 83 is LLC only. This course will satisfy the Shakespeare requirement in the old Major, and count as a lower division elective in the new Major. English 240 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 250-01: Literary Foundations - CRN 2683

Stefan Vander Elst, TR 10:45am-12:05pm

In this course, we will explore foundational English-language literature and hone skills in sensitive reading, critical thinking, and persuasive writing. We will focus on authors who were pioneers of form and content and who contributed to the formation of literary traditions. Why are metaphysical poets such fitting bedfellows with Modernists? What’s the literary trajectory from the Bible to William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell? How does Shakespeare adapt Chaucer, and why does Milton’s Paradise Lost appear throughout Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein? How does Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative participate in multiple genres, setting the stage for T. S. Eliot’s polyvocal The Waste Land? We will use the narratives that we read to generate a greater narrative of literary history.
Authors may include: Ovid, Petrarch, Chaucer, Wyatt, Queen Elizabeth, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Milton, Swift, Wollstonecraft, Equiano, Blake, Keats, Shelley, Poe, Dickinson, Carroll, Hopkins, Eliot, Hughes, Auden, and Lorde.

Note: This course is required for the new major, but students continuing in the old major are welcome to take it as a lower-division elective. English 250 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

 

English 250-02: Literary Foundations - CRN 2684

Jeanie Grant Moore, MWF 9:05-10:00am

This course will be structured around starting points, or “firsts” in literature. Selections may include The Wife of Bath’s Prologue, the first fictional autobiography; Hamlet, the first representation of what came to be known as the Cartesian subject; Milton’s Areopagitica, the first significant articulation of free speech in England; the Princess de Cleves, the first novel; Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World, the first science fiction novel; Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, a work by the first woman to earn her living as a writer; The Life of Olaudoh Equiano, the first influential slave narrative; Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, the first detective novel; the Spanish novel, Lazarillo de Tormes, arguably the first of the picaresque genre; and Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, one of the earliest examples of stream-of-consciousness narration. As we examine the development of these milestone works we will consider their place in the cultural/historical circumstances that produced them, as well as their reciprocal influence on the culture itself.

Note: This course is required for the new major, but students continuing in the old major are welcome to take it as a lower-division elective. English 250 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 260-01: Critical Reading - CRN 2685

Fred Robinson, TR 2:30-3:50pm

Our goal will be to teach English majors and minors how to develop critical thinking skills in relation to literature, so that their analyses will not be summaries in disguise. The semester breaks down into three parts: 1) reading all the assigned texts in the first month of class, without yet writing about them; 2) writing short essays that involve the nature of interpretation, themes, discourse, culture/race/gender, and allusion/background; and 3) preparing a longer, final essay using some of these methods, and learning research fundamentals.

Required for new major.  Counts as lower division elective in the old major.

 

English 292: Southeast San Diego Tutoring Project, CRNs 2686, 2687, 7 2688

Timothy Randell

Formerly English 298.
This is a ten-week course/internship during which you will tutor children in a local elementary or middle school in basic reading, writing, and math (depending on your assigned teacher/class). You will work at the school to which you are assigned with a teacher who will structure your activities with the children. Each week you will write a short journal to reflect on your experiences concerning a specific element of the school, your pupils, and other experiences concerning lesson plans or the learning environment. You will turn in the journal assignments periodically throughout the semester (not once a week or all at once at the end of the semester) to ensure accurate, unhurried, and thoughtful reflection. Tutors may commit to 3, 6, or 9 hours of tutoring per week (for 1, 2, or 3 academic credits per semester, respectively), and the course may be taken more than once (as often as tutors wish) to accommodate academic needs and time schedules.
The course counts for English elective credit. Lower Division students register for English 292, and Upper Division students register for English 492.

English 301-01: Intro to Creative Writing - CRN 2689

Bradley Melekian, TR 10:45am-12:05pm

Formerly English 375. 

We will approach this course with the understanding that studying creative writing is different from the study of something more analytical—mathematics, say. To that end, some basic premises will serve as the foundation for this course: That good writing is the culmination of serious thinking, heartfelt conviction, diligent work and a commitment to rewriting, reshaping, rethinking. That learning to write seriously, originally and creatively—which must be the goal of every student enrolled in this course—is more an instruction in process than a process of downloading information. Your enrollment in this course is a signal of your dedication to the craft of writing, & to doing the work necessary to further your abilities as a writer. It is the operating premise of this course that the most effective means of doing this is to read, & to write. In this course, students will be expected to write creatively every week, to read voraciously, & to write commentaries on the techniques they encounter in what they read. With this operating premise, it's important that students are dedicated to the coursework that will be expected of them. This course will be time-consuming and demanding. We will read & write in the genres of fiction, nonfiction & poetry.

 

English 301-02: Intro to Creative Writing - CRN 2690

Lisa Hemminger, MWF 10:10-11:05am

Formerly English 375.

Introduction to Creative Writing guides you to see the world and people in a different light, to read with a greater immersion, and to write with imagination and knowledge. Experience, discuss, and imitate works in four genres. Writing and philosophies of artists including Emily Dickinson, Truman Capote, and Stephen King will be highlighted.

English 304W-01 & -04: Advanced Composition - CRNs 1195 & 3851

Nicole Johnson, MWF 11:15am-12:05pm & MWF 12:20-1:15pm

Our objective is to learn how to write active, analytical, descriptive, sustained (i.e., structured) prose through writing about a complex subject that you know a great deal about, more than anyone else: your life so far. This is not a course in learning how to write an autobiography, or in studying the genre, but in advanced composition.  You will write short essays on parents, place, values, cultural influences, a turning point, etc., and then use those essays to build a 20-25 pp. autobiographical essay due at the end of the semester.
Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304W-02: Advanced Composition - CRN 1879

Timothy Randell, MWF 9:05-10:00am

Advanced Composition offers intensive practice in active reading, critical thinking, and close analyses of texts and writing within various rhetorical situations, genres, and discourse communities. The course highlights academic skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. It emphasizes an understanding of what Wayne Booth calls “the rhetorical stance,” which includes “discovering and maintaining in any writing situation a proper balance” among three aspects of the communicative process: “the available arguments about the subject itself; the interests and peculiarities of the audience; and the voice (the implied character) of the speaker.”  This course asks students to consider how different audiences and contexts shape the rhetorical situation. We will analyze texts from popular culture in class to explore ideas related to the assignments, and you will research examples of popular culture on your own as part of your writing projects.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304W-03: Advanced Composition, CRN 2691

Vivienne MacAdam, MWF 10:10-11:05am

This course is a workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive and critical prose. Texts will include: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Of Love and Other Demons; Nadine Gordimer, Jump and Other Stories; Michael Ondaatje, Running in the Family; J.M. Coetzee, Foe; and Haruiki Murakami, Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

 

English 304W-05: Advanced Composition - CRN 3852

Charles Patton, TR 9:15-10:35am

A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 312: Chaucer - CRN 3853

Stefan Vander Elst, TR 2:30-3:50pm

This course offers an in-depth look at the works of the medieval English poet Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400). Widely credited with reviving English as a literary language after a long period of Latin and French domination, Chaucer compiled an extensive and varied body of works. We will discuss Chaucer’s writings from his earliest poems to his last and greatest work, the Canterbury Tales. We will devote special attention to Chaucer’s use of continental literary traditions; we will see how works such as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, the Romance of the Rose, and Boccaccio’s Decameron influenced Chaucer, and helped him create a truly English literature of wit and learning.

Satisfies one of the two the ‘Literary Histories’ requirements of the new English major and the pre-1660 requirement of the old English major.

English 315: Literary Periods - CRN 3854

Sara Hasselbach, MW 2:30-3:50pm

Reformation-era English writers necessarily work within a religious climate of disruption, as the church moved nonlinearly within a range of theological expressions between Catholic ceremony and Protestant individuality. These writers grapple with such questions as: how do art, imagination, and invention factor into representations of religious devotion?
In this course, we will explore how English writers of the 16th and 17th centuries use literature as a site of expressive negotiation for establishing their complicated religious identities. The instability of religious and political institutions in Reformation-era England influences the rise in authorial, particularly poetic, self-consciousness. What is the relationship between the word and its generative source, the self? How do writers negotiate tensions between private and performative expression, between didacticism and self-promotion, between sincerity and creation, between feeling and articulation? The interrelation of religion, politics, and literature in this period translates to a rich climate of theological and expressive multiplicity.
Some writers we may study this semester include: Martin Luther, John Calvin, St. Teresa of Ávila, Christopher Marlowe, Queen Elizabeth I, John Donne, Robert Herrick, George Herbert, Aemilia Lanyer, Richard Crashaw, Andrew Marvell, Henry Vaughan, Thomas Traherne, and John Milton.

Satisfies one of the two the ‘Literary Histories’ requirements of the new English major and the pre-1660 requirement of the old English major.

English 319-01: Nineteenth Century Novel - CRN 2693

Sister Mary Hotz, MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

In this course we will become serial readers, delving into 4 major novels on the installment plan. That is, we will read novels according to their serialization schedules, or original monthly numbers, and we will read the novels simultaneously, just as the Victorians did. Mondays will be devoted to the longer novels, Lady Audley’s Secret and Jude the Obscure while Wednesdays and Fridays will be given to Hard Times and Hound of the Baskervilles. Reading the novels side-by-side, with life intervening, acknowledges our multitasking culture as well as customary Victorian reading practices. The close reading across novels also allows for more immediate comparisons of styles, structures, themes, and issues concerning the development of the novel in the nineteenth century.

Satisfies the Literary Histories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major.

English 321: Prison of Slavery and the Slavery of Prison - CRN 3855

Mychal Odom, TR 10:45am-12:05pm

In this course we will examine narratives, songs, testimonies of the (formerly) incarcerated and other cultural products of the formerly enslaved and incarcerated.  It examines the way these cultural products of the formerly incarcerated disrupt the narrative of incarceration produced by systems of power.  This course understands power and resistance to power as intersectional and will examine race, class, gender, sexuality, and childhood as overlapping systems of oppression through which resistance is also generated.

Satisfies the Literary Cultures and Theories requirement of the new English major.  Fulfills 1900 to Present requirement in the old major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the old major.

English 329-01: U.S. Autobiography - CRN 2695

Irene Williams, TR 9:15-10:35am

We will be reading, studying, writing about, and discussing miscellaneous autobiographical writings; investigating the genre as it has been theorized; and inquiring into how versions of self are constructed in culture.  Readings may include works by Whitman, Dickinson, Henry Adams, Gilman, Stein, Toklas, Ginsburg, Baldwin, Dahlberg, Feldman, Lorde, Patti Smith, Rankine, Kiese Laymon, or others.

Satisfies Literary Cultures and Theories requirement for the English major. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major. Fulfills 1900 to Present requirement in the old major.

 

English 331-01: Roman Myth, CRN 2696

Joseph McGowan, MWF 10:10-11:05am

Though there are many shared features between Greek and Roman myth, and borrowings and inheritances, Roman myth is nonetheless distinct in its Italic heritage. Perhaps more so than Greek, Roman myth was essential to the origin of the state and its institutions: Romulus and Remus; Quirinus; Aeneas, Latinus, Lavinia, and Turnus; Lucretia, the Vestal Virgins, the Tarpeian Rock. But life at the local and household level had its gods (lares, penates) and rites (Remus and the first furrow, Ceres, the Arval Brethren). Terminus looked out over boundaries, whether between neighbors’ fields or round the city itself (the sacred pomerium). Moral values were encoded in myth – the sacrality of oaths and federation, the duty of pietas (Aeneas, the Catanean Brothers), the calendar itself, divided among days that permitted (dies fasti) or prohibited (dies nefasti) regular business. Rome absorbed its neighbors politically, and culturally, borrowing from Etruscans, Volscians, Sabines, Oscans, Umbrians, and others. And Roman writers tirelessly alluded to their myths, from epic to lyric poets, dramatists, historical and legal writers, thus we will try to gain a sense of the literary legacy of myth as well (Virgil’s Aeneid, Ovid’s Fasti, among others).

Satisfies the Literary Cultures and Theories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills the pre-1660 requirement of the old English major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the old major.

 

English 343: Jane Austen, CRN 2887

Ivan Ortiz, T 4:00-6:50pm

Formerly English 336.
Two hundred years after the publication of her fiction, Jane Austen still has a firm hold on the literary—and cinematic—world. We find Austen everywhere, from a steady train of Hollywood adaptations to zombie fiction. What is it about Austen’s carefully crafted social worlds that keeps us coming back for more? This course will introduce students to Austen’s novels and juvenilia by situating them in the author’s own time. We will address social and political issues facing her characters, including marriage, inheritance, female education, slavery, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic Wars. Students will also read a short selection of critical essays that open up fresh questions in literary criticism and theory now. In a series of short essays and a final paper, students will write critically about Austen’s characters, her style, and the culture that surrounded her. At the end of the course, we will debate Austen’s lasting importance to our own time.

Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major.

 

English 358-01: Ways of Seeing: Black Eyes on the United States - CRN 3856

Carlton Floyd, W 6:00-8:50pm

We will take on the works of several established writers of note associated with African America, namely, but not limited to, Toni Morrison’s Paradise, James Baldwin’s Another Country, and Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower. These selections offer revelatory depictions of the kinds of worlds and words in which we are formed, and insight into other possible worlds we may wish to seek.

Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 358-70: U.S. Ethnic Literature: Photography & Literature - CRN 2697

Marcelle Maese-Cohen, TR 4:00-5:20pm

By teaching us how to see the world, photographs also teach us a language and way of being in the world. Like literature, photographs provide a virtual space where different people and ideas meet. What are the politics of this encounter? Who is seen? Who is silenced? The authors we will read incorporate photographs within the pages of the books they write. The visual images they include are as an important to creating a narrative as the words they place on the page. As viewers and readers, our study of the relation between photography and literature will ask questions concerned with beauty, power, and desire. As part of the Inspire Transfer Learning Community (TLC), students will also consider how the particularities of their major can contribute to a “Changemaking” worldview that inspires dignity for all. In particular, students will produce a cumulative project for the Integrative TLC Showcase at the end of the semester.

Section 70 is TLC only.

 

English 358-71: Contemporary Ethnic Dystopias - CRN 2698

Jason Crum, MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our sources for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany’s Trouble on Triton, Nedi Okorafor’s Lagoon, Cynthia Khodata’s In the Heart of the Valley of Love. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera’s Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men and video game productions such as Bioshock: Infinite.

Section 71 is TLC only.

English 363-72: Global Studies - CRN 3881

Atreyee Phukan, TR 9:15-10:35am

This course uses the conceptual framework of “spoken word”—performance, word play, and improvisation — to assess the special role of pronouns in fiction, from the slave narrative, post-colonial bildungsroman, to the feminist memoir. We will 363study how a writer’s fictional I or you is a performative gesture in breaking walls between text and audience, thus strategically inviting the reader into new and otherwise unfamiliar imaginative worlds. We will focus on mostly world literature and engage specifically with the aesthetics of participatory reading, a kind of close-reading that attends to the deep interconnections between literary structure, political protest, and reader response. In addition, we will incorporate theoretical writings (including, but not limited to, Roland Barthes, Frantz Fanon, Gloria Anzaldua, and Ngugi Wa Thiong’o) on literary expression and production, culture and resistance, and the post-colonial diaspora. These will develop historical, social and political perspectives that inform our analysis. By integrating these multiple perspectives and disciplinary approaches, we will acquire a vocabulary and conceptual framework to guide our semester-long inquiries into how genre and narrative strategies are employed by minority writers, e.g. women, indigenous, queer, and working class. Writers include Aphra Behn, Mary Prince, J. M. Coetzee, Junot Diaz, Jamaica Kincaid, and Riad Sattouf.

Section 72 is TLC only. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 377-01: Development of the English Language, CRN 2701

Joseph McGowan, MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

Formerly English 318.
This course will trace the origins and historical development of the English language from its Indo-European roots to contemporary dialects of American English and varieties of World English.  By the end of the course students will have mastered the fundamentals of language analysis and introductory linguistics and developed the ability to describe and analyze language and language varieties. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics of current American English, with additional emphases upon dialectology, language change, and theories of language acquisition.

Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major. Required for Liberal Studies.

English 385-01: Screenwriting - CRN 2702

Dennis Clausen, M 6:00-8:50pm

Formerly English 376.
To understand the craft of screenwriting, students must learn to look at literature in an entirely different way. Literary techniques that are often on the fringes of more traditional literature courses that focus on ideas, themes and/or issues take on a whole new meaning. To the screenwriter, structure, foreshadowing, plot, sub-plot, dialogue, character development, dramatic conflict and many other techniques are indispensable tools the writer must master to create a compelling story that holds the viewer's interest. Structural issues, especially, are paramount concerns for any successful screenwriter. Indeed, many screenwriters insist that the 3 most important elements in a screenplay are STRUCTURE, STRUCTURE, AND STRUCTURE!  Students will be expected to participate fully in our discussions of the art of storytelling as it pertains to screenwriting. For this reason, classroom attendance is mandatory. There will be oral reports and other assignments, but the major requirement will be for each student to produce a 60 page motion picture screenplay.

Although there are some exceptions, the class will be primarily limited to English majors who have completed English 301 Intro to Creative Writing (formerly 375). Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing - CRN 2703

Malachi Black, T 6:00-8:50pm

Formerly English 391. 
This advanced three-hour workshop will be chiefly invested in the generation and consideration of new work by class members, but these aims will be both complemented and informed by two related engagements:  (1) a small survey of recently published first collections (contest winners and press selections alike) and (2) weekly accompanying readings from poet-critic James Longenbach’s collection of inventive craft meditations, The Virtues of Poetry (Graywolf, 2013).  Texts will include Natalie Diaz’s When My Brother Was an Aztec (Copper Canyon, 2012); Tarfia Faizullah’s Seam (Southern Illinois, 2014); Chloe Honum’s The Tulip-Flame (Cleveland State, 2014); Rowan Ricardo Phillips’ The Ground (FSG, 2013); Matt Rasmussen’s Black Aperture (LSU, 2013); and Jacob Shores-Arguello’s In the Absence of Clocks (Southern Illinois, 2012).  In addition to much reading, writing, and revision, this course will require that students deliver two in-depth presentations: a critical introduction to one of the assigned poetry collections and an analytical introduction to an independently discovered literary journal.  A memorization will round out the abundance of our vivid lives in verse.

Prerequisite: Engl 381 Intermediate Poetry Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 402-01: Advanced Fiction Writing - CRN 2704

Halina Duraj, M 2:30-5:20pm

Formerly English 392.
In this course, students will generate, submit for feedback, and revise at least two 10-15 page stories. Students will also lead discussion on published stories, respond visually and verbally to each other’s in-progress stories at numerous stages, consider themselves in the larger context of making art in the world by being exposed to profiles of other artists (writers, musicians, sculptors, and performance artists), and will prepare for a public reading of their own work—all activities that prepare students for an MFA program or a lifelong fiction writing vocation. This three-hour, once-a-week workshop will introduce students to a graduate-style workshop. We will also discuss the professional aspects of fiction writing, including publication, writing outside of the academic context, and the pros and cons of M.F.A programs.

Prerequisite: Engl 382 Intermediate Fiction Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 403-01: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing - CRN 2705

Bradley Melekian, W 2:30-5:20pm

Formerly English 393
In this Advanced Nonfiction Writing course, students will generate works of creative nonfiction, ranging from the memoir to the personal essay to nonfiction feature writing. We will build on the techniques explored in the prerequisite course, Intermediate Nonfiction, and investigate the genre of narrative nonfiction—that is, nonfiction subjects written with fictional techniques. We will approach this course with the understanding that good writing is the culmination of serious thinking, heartfelt conviction, diligent work and a commitment to rewriting, reshaping, rethinking. Our understanding will further be that learning to write seriously, originally and creatively—which must be the goal of every student enrolled in this course—is an instruction in process. To that end, students will read landmark works of nonfiction from writers like Baldwin, Didion, McPhee, Mailer, Capote, Wolfe, Talese, Dillard and others to explore the ways in which the genre has developed and changed, and to consider how the best nonfiction writing goes beyond factual reporting to access truths about the human experience. Students will be expected to generate original writing each week, to read and critique the work of their classmates, to read and discuss exemplary works of the genre, to workshop (read aloud) their work and to consider the artful pairing of factual experience with creative writing. Instructor approval is required for this course.

Prerequisite: Engl 383 Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 410-01: Advanced Writing in the English Major: The Sensational Restoration - CRN 2792

Cynthia Caywood, TR 9:15-10:35am

Formerly English "W" course.
The Sensational Restoration focuses on British literature written between 1660 and 1690 during the reign of Charles II, one of Britain’s most storied kings.  We study it within the context of Charles’ life, framing the works of such period writers as Aphra Behn, William Wycherley, John Wilmot, George Etheredge, and Samuel Pepys with the political, sexual and cultural revolutions of his reign.  We will also set these writers into conversation with their progenitors and their successors.  A few examples:  Moliere’s Don Juan will be paired with William Wycherley’s controversial sex comedy, The Country Wife; Samuel Pepys’s diaries about the Great Plague of 1665 with Geraldine Brooks recent plague novel, Year of Wonder; and Aphra Behn’s masterful slave novel Oroonoko with contemporary African playwright Biyi Bandele’s adaptation of it. Frequent writing assignments and a research project will be at the center of our work.

English 410W counts for the departmental Advanced Writing requirement in both the old and new majors as well as for Advanced Writing in the Core.  Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major.  Minors and Humanities majors are welcome

Interdisciplinary (INST) 450: Epicuriosity: Cuisine, Culture, Community – CRN 3617

Atreyee Phukan and Jonathan Bowman

This course on “Epicuriosity” combines literary inquiry with communication theories to explore how habits and rituals surrounding food define cultural and communal identity. Following from the Greek wordEpicurean (a person devoted to the enjoyment of food and drink) this semester-long interdisciplinary class will cultivate in students a deeper understanding of the intricacies of food and its function as a medium for cultural contact and communication, cultural diversity, and the enculturation of hierarchy. In thinking critically about how, what, when, with whom, and why we and others eat, a primary course objective will be to analyze how different communities center ideas about cultural authenticity, history, and tradition through rituals of making and sharing certain cuisines – and even abstaining from others. While the production and consumption of food and drink informs and facilitates interpersonal relationships, they also mark the ways in which humans navigate the non-human world (including our relationship with plants, animals, etc.). Our collective end-of-semester exercise will involve group projects that teach about cuisine, culture, and community in the context of sustainability and environmental justice. 

This course fulfills Advanced Integration for the core, and can be taken as an upper-division elective by English majors and minors.

English 492: Southeast San Diego Tutoring Program - CRNs 2706, 2707, 2708

Timothy Randell
Formerly English 498
This is a ten-week course/internship during which you will tutor children in a local elementary or middle school in basic reading, writing, and math (depending on your assigned teacher/class). You will work at the school to which you are assigned with a teacher who will structure your activities with the children. Each week you will write a short journal to reflect on your experiences concerning a specific element of the school, your pupils, and other experiences concerning lesson plans or the learning environment. You will turn in the journal assignments periodically throughout the semester (not once a week or all at once at the end of the semester) to ensure accurate, unhurried, and thoughtful reflection. Tutors may commit to 3, 6, or 9 hours of tutoring per week (for 1, 2, or 3 academic credits per semester, respectively), and the course may be taken more than once (as often as tutors wish) to accommodate academic needs and time schedules.
The course counts for English elective credit. Lower Division students register for English 292, and Upper Division students register for English 492 (formerly ENGL 298 & 498)

English 493: Writing Center Tutors - CRNs 1535, 1536, 1537

Deborah Sundmacher

Theory and practice for Writing Center tutors. Consent of Writing Center director required.
Instructor Approval required.

Humanities 394/English 494: Digital Humanities - CRN 4265 & 4387

Paul Evans, TR 2:30-3:50pm
Digital Humanities is an exciting new field that uses computing technology as a way of investigating questions in the humanities, and that uses the humanities as a way of approaching questions about digital culture. This course combines hands-on, skills-based, learning with reading, critical thinking, and writing about Digital Humanities. Students will learn how to use tools that will be useful in all of their courses at USD and beyond, including Zotero, in conjunction with online resources like JSTOR and Project MUSE, for bibliography and footnote management. Moving beyond the traditional Word-PDF paradigm, students will explore writing tools like Pandoc, scholarly publishing platforms like Scalar, and the creation of online digital editions using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) format. Finally, we will explore advanced techniques like topic modeling and stylometry using the Lexos text analysis tool. Students with any level of previous computer experience, and none, are welcome!

English 496-01 Alcalá Review - CRN 2793

Malachi Black

Formerly English 494.
Reserved for active members of the editorial staff of the Alcalá Review only, this course serves as a practicum in literary magazine editing, concentrating on the strategies, activities, and procedures associated with all facets of managing, planning, and publishing a literary periodical.
1-Unit Internship; Instructor Approval required.

English 496-02: The Tudor Plays Project - CRN 2794

Paul Evans and Maura Giles-Watson

The Tudor Plays Project is a 1-credit Digital Humanities research project and creative activity that develops new Internet resources for the study and performance of earlier Tudor drama (before Shakespeare), especially the debate plays performed at the court of Henry VIII. These resources are then published at tudorplays.org. Permission of instructor is required for registration. If you are interested in participating (whether for credit or not), contact Maura Giles-Watson (mgileswatson@sandiego.edu).
Meetings in Digital Humanities Studio, Humanities Center (Serra 200); meeting times TBD by participants' availability.