Anthropology Courses

As the holistic discipline of being human, anthropology has application for all fields of endeavor. Courses in anthropology are particularly suitable for students interested in international business, resource management, environmental concerns, teaching, educational administration, public service and archaeology.

Students entering the University of San Diego and/or declaring a major during 2015-2016, should follow information contained in the printed course catalog (also known as the "catalog of record") published on October 1, 2015. Access the catalog of record at http://catalogs.sandiego.edu.

Introductory Courses

ANTH 101, ANTH 102, ANTH 103

ANTH 101 | INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Units: 3

An investigation of the nature of humankind, including the history of evolutionary theory, the fossil record, dating techniques, primate evolution and behavior, and human heredity, variation, and adaptation. Every semester.

ANTH 102 | INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

Units: 3

An introduction to the nature of culture, techniques of fieldwork, linguistics, components of cultural systems, such as subsistence patterns, socio-political organization, religion, worldview, diversity, change, and current problems. Every semester.

ANTH 103 | INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

Units: 3

A discussion of the techniques and concepts used by archaeologists to understand humankind through material culture. Every semester.

Upper Division Courses 

ANTH 300, ANTH 310, ANTH 311, ANTH 312, ANTH 313, ANTH 314, ANTH 320, ANTH 321D, ANTH 323D, ANTH 327, ANTH 328, ANTH 330D, ANTH 331D, ANTH 334, ANTH 335, ANTH 339, ANTH 341, ANTH 343, ANTH 349W, ANTH 350, ANTH 360, ANTH 362, ANTH 364, ANTH 370, ANTH 380, ANTH 385, ANTH 390, ANTH 391, ANTH 460, ANTH 463, ANTH 470, ANTH 494, ANTH 498, ANTH 499

ANTH 300 | RESEARCH SEMINAR

Units: 3

A course wherein students develop a special topic that contributes new knowledge in the discipline. Research includes laboratory, field, or library investigation.

ANTH 310 | HUMAN EVOLUTION

Units: 3

An examination of early developments and current knowledge about hominid origins. New scientific discoveries which are shedding light on early hominids will be investigated, as will evidence of human biological and cultural adaptation, and the theories surrounding modern humans and, among others, Neandertals and Denisovans.

ANTH 311 | PRIMATOLOGY

Units: 3

An introduction to the study of non-human primates: prosimians, New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. The course focuses on primate behavior and how it relates to the study of human biocultural evolution. Of special concern are the relationships and adaptations of the primates to varied environments. The primate collection at the San Diego Zoo will be an integral part of the course. Various observational and data collecting techniques will be employed in zoo projects.

ANTH 312 | PALEOPATHOLOGY

Units: 3

An introduction to the study of ancient human pathologies through the study of bones and mummies. The course will focus on how the human skeletal system adapts to trauma, disease organisms, and environmental conditions, such as diet, climate, temperature, soil, and water. Basic skeletal anatomy and other osteological techniques such as age and sex determination will be an essential part of the course. Current problems in epidemiology will be examined in relation to diseases of the past.

ANTH 313 | FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Units: 3

A survey of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists to assist in the identification of human skeletal remains. The course will focus on learning how to tell human from animal bones, sex identification from the skeleton, age estimation from bone and teeth, stature estimation from measurements of limb bones, and occupational inferences from stress marks on bones.

ANTH 314 | BONES: HUMAN OSTEOLOGY

Units: 3

The study of the human skeleton in two main areas: identification of recently deceased individuals in a legal context, and historic or prehistoric remains as a contribution to human history. This hands-on course will include bone biology, development, growth, variation, and repair. Students will identify all parts of the skeletal system and dentition and learn how to measure bones and identify non-metric features and stress markers.

ANTH 320 | NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES

Units: 3

Prerequisites: ANTH 102

A survey of prehistory, history, social organization, economy, worldview, and contemporary issues of American Indian and Inuit groups across North America (north of Mexico) from ethnohistorical and applied anthropology perspectives. Regional adaptations stemming from environmental and intercultural linkages are highlighted.

ANTH 321D | CALIFORNIA AND GREAT BASIN INDIAN CULTURES

Units: 3

An overview of the environment and cultural history of native California and the neighboring Great Basin region. Close examination of Southern California groups: Gabrileño, Serrano, Cahuilla, Cupeño, Luiseño, and Kumeyaay cultures and contemporary issues. Lecture-discussions, ethnographies, biographies, and California Indian guest lecturers. Field trips may be included.

ANTH 323D | SOUTHWEST INDIAN CULTURES

Units: 3

A survey of the ethnography of Native Americans in the Greater Southwest (the American Southwest and the Mexican Northwest). Emphasis on the interplay of each culture with its ecological environment and surrounding cultures, particularly the historically dominant colonial European settlers.

ANTH 327 | SOUTH AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES

Units: 3

A survey of the aboriginal populations of South America; origins and development of culture types as revealed by archaeology, biological anthropology, colonial writings, and modern ethnographic studies.

ANTH 328 | CARIBBEAN CULTURES

Units: 3

A survey of the environments, ethnohistory, cultures, and current concerns of the peoples of the Caribbean region, including the Greater and Lesser Antilles and the east coast of Central America.

ANTH 330D | NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

Units: 3

An examination of the development of the prehistoric cultures of North America from the earliest occupations to the historic period. This course examines the evidence for the first migrations into the North America and subsequent development of the diversity of Native American cultures. The culture area approach (i.e., the Arctic, Subarctic, Northwest, Midwest, Great Plains, Northeast, Southeast, Southwest, Great Basin, and California) will be used to organize the class discussions. The primary emphasis will be the culture areas north of Mexico, but developments in Mesoamerica will be discussed where relevant.

ANTH 331D | SOUTHWESTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

Units: 3

An examination of the development and changing face of human adaptation in the southwestern part of North America since the earliest human occupations. Views based on archaeological evidence are emphasized. The course highlights the diversity of environmental zones and shifting strategies of resource utilization seen in the region that date from prehistoric times to the end of the 19th century.

ANTH 334 | SOUTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

Units: 3

An introductory survey of the prehistoric cultures of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Chile. The focus of the course is upon the artistic, ideological, social, and economic aspects of the Cupisnique, Moche, Nasca, Inca, and other cultures. The development and evolution of prehispanic Andean society are examined from a processual viewpoint.

ANTH 335 | NAUTICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

Units: 3

An introduction to the practice of archaeology underwater. This course examines maritime-based civilizations and their impact on society. Emphasis is placed on the role of the ship in exploration, discovery, contact, empire, trade, and warfare.

ANTH 339 | POST MEDIEVAL SEAFARING AND EMPIRE

Units: 3

A survey course that examines the advents of shipbuilding and seafaring to promote Empire in the New World. Beginning with Columbus’ voyages at the close of the fifteenth century and concluding with the American Civil War, students will utilize archaeological and historical sources to better understand colonization, waterborne commerce, and naval warfare.

ANTH 341 | MUSEOLOGY

Units: 3

An introduction to museum work combining theory, critique, and practice. The course presents the history of museums, the development of curation and conservation practices, and focuses on the educational role of modern museums through exhibit design and installation. Field trips to local museums and galleries are requisite.

ANTH 343 | THE ANCIENT DEAD: BIOARCHAELOGY

Units: 3

An examination of how archaeologists and biological anthropologists excavate and analyze the remains of past societies. Students are introduced to the theories, methods, and techniques of fieldwork and laboratory analysis. Basic skeletal and artifact analysis is the core of the course. Lectures, readings, group discussions, digital presentations, and guest speakers are also included. Field trips may supplement the core material.

ANTH 349W | WRITING ANTHROPOLOGY

Units: 3

A practicum in anthropological writing including professional publication (books and journals), grant proposals (both for funds and fellowships), popular journals, museum exhibition catalogs, and electronic media. Students in this course will learn to communicate effectively in various formats following guidelines established by the American Anthropological Association, American Association of Museums, and funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation.

ANTH 350 | PEOPLING OF THE AMERICAS

Units: 3

When 16th century Europeans arrived in the New World they found it densely inhabited. Speculation then began as to who the people were, where they had come from, and when they had arrived. From the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel to the ancestors of the Ainu, no group seems to have been exempt from consideration. In this survey course we examine various claims for places of origin and times of arrival. We investigate the level and weight of available evidence, and learn how to scientifically evaluate it. Archaeological, geological, bioanthropological, linguistic, genetic, and maritime data are brought to bear on the question.

ANTH 360 | NAUTICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA

Units: 3

A survey course that examines the advent of seafaring in California, from the Paleolithic to Modern Ages. Students will utilize archaeological and historical sources to explore a variety of strategies for resource utilization, water-borne commerce, and the burgeoning naval defense industry, beginning with early coastal settlers and ending in the 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on San Diego’s maritime history.

ANTH 362 | PIRACY IN THE NEW WORLD

Units: 3

An examination of the sociology of seafaring communities through the historical record of piratical activity, the economic impact of piracy on contemporary societies, the archaeological evidence of pirate ventures, the sensationalism of pirate legend, and the cultural responses to the influences of the pirate phenomenon.

ANTH 364 | SURF CULTURE AND HISTORY

Units: 3

This course examines the historical and socio-cultural components of one of Southern California’s fastest growing leisure activities. Successful participation in this sport and membership in its local subcultures are contingent upon specialized knowledge of geography, wave physics, weather patterns, ocean biota, board design, and the often complex yet subtle intricacies of regional customs. Emphasis is placed on surfing’s Polynesian roots and their transmission — via the Hawaiian Islands — to Southern California, whence surf music, literature, art, and movies have become ambassadors for an international phenomenon.

ANTH 370 | INDIGENOUS RELIGIONS

Units: 3

An examination of the elements, forms, and symbolism of religion among indigenous peoples; role of religion in society; anthropological theories of belief systems.

ANTH 380 | CULTURAL DIVERSITY

Units: 3

A cross-cultural study of social systems; principles of organization and relationships of society to ecological conditions; methodology of comparisons; and ethnographic materials.

ANTH 385 | NATIVE PEOPLES OF NORTHWEST EUROPE

Units: 3

A survey of the origins and migrations of the indigenous people of northwest Europe from Paleolithic times into the historic period, with a focus on the peoples who became known as the “Anglos.” The methodologies of archaeology, history, and the bioanthropology are used to understand these native populations.

ANTH 390 | ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE BIBLE

Units: 3

A two-fold broad-based survey emphasizing historical contexts, archaeological sites, and material culture from the Early Bronze through Iron Ages in the Eastern Mediterranean world, corresponding to historical and literary references in the 1) Bible ("Tanakh") and 2) Christian New Testament.

ANTH 391 | BETHSAIDA ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL

Units: 3

The course introduces students to field archaeology through excavation of the biblical kingdom of Geshur (Bethsaida in the Christian New Testament). Students will excavate, conduct laboratory analyses, attend evening lectures, and travel to and study other archaeological sites in Israel. Prereq: consent of instructor. Offered Summers only.

ANTH 460 | ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD METHODS

Units: 3

A fieldwork course that applies standard ethnographic methods of participant/observation and interviewing techniques, life history studies, demographic method, genealogical method, and etic-emic distinctions. No library work required. Student initiates individual field research projects using ethnographic techniques. Every spring semester.

ANTH 463 | ANTIQUITIES: WHO OWNS THE PAST?

Units: 3

An anthropological investigation of ethical ownership of the past. The black-market in antiquities is a multi-million dollar a year business despite the attempt of most countries to stake legal claim to such objects as national patrimony. This course examines the current chain of events in antiquities trafficking, from the peasant digging in his field to sales in the world’s premier auction houses. It also examines the means by which most of the world’s museums came by their antiquities collections and the controversy concerning their continued ownership.

ANTH 470 | SHAMANS, ART AND CREATIVITY

Units: 3

An investigation of the phenomenon of art in human society from earliest times to the present. The course considers art as an integral part of culture and examines the role of the shaman in art’s origins. The course samples a wide range of art traditions in their cultural context, such as that of the Huichols of northwestern Mexico, the Shipibo of eastern Peru, and the Tungus reindeer herders of Siberia.

ANTH 494 | ISSUES IN ANTHROPOLOGY

Units: 3-4 Repeatability: Yes (Repeatable if topic differs)

Critical discussions with regard to major issues confronting the various sub-disciplines of anthropology. May be repeated for anthropology elective credit if topic differs.

ANTH 498 | INTERNSHIP

Units: 3

An apprenticeship to be undertaken within the San Diego anthropological community (that is, San Diego Museum of Man, the San Diego Archaeological Center, the Office of the San Diego County Archaeologist, CALTRANS, Mingei International Museum, etc.). The apprenticeship will be developed by the student, his or her mentor, and the Department of Anthropology. Prereq: consent of department chair. Every semester.

ANTH 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY

Units: 1-3

A project developed by the student in coordination with an instructor that investigates a field of interest to the student not normally covered by established anthropology courses. Prereq: consent of instructor and department chair. Every semester.

Department of Anthropology
College of Arts and Sciences

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