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Title"BusinessWeek" Ranks USD's Business Program 29th in the Nation
Date2.26.09
ContactLiz Harman
Contact E-mailharman, at sandiego.edu
Contact Phone(619) 260-4682
Text

USD’s Undergrad Program Is Biggest Gainer on Annual List

The University of San Diego now ranks 29th in the nation on BusinessWeek’s 2009 list of the top 50 undergraduate business programs. USD, which has ranked in the top 50 for three years in a row, rose 18 spots this year, the largest jump on the magazine’s list.

USD’s undergrad program is now one of the top three in the state of California along with the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Southern California.  BusinessWeek released the list late Thursday afternoon. USD was the highest-ranked school in the West Coast Conference of athletic teams.

Last year USD ranked 47th on the list. USD’s rise, was due in part to its ranking of 11th this year in corporate recruiter satisfaction with students. For the second year in a row, USD students also gave faculty an A+ for their teaching efforts.

According to BusinessWeek, “institutions that succeeded in helping students navigate the difficult job market improved their standings the most” and that USD saw its “fortunes rise due to a strong focus on accounting, where jobs are still plentiful.”  The magazine also said that the view from USD students is that “a close-knit program helps students feel at home (and that) improved recruiting efforts are starting to pay off.”

“It is very satisfying to have the hard work we have put into building a world-class business school recognized by BusinessWeek,” said USD School of Business Administration Dean David Pyke. “The jump in our ranking reflects the tireless efforts of the entire faculty and staff to deliver on the School of Business Administration’s dual promise of academic excellence and outstanding student service.”

Stephen Standifird, associate dean of the business school, said “We are thrilled that BusinessWeek  has recognized our program as one of the best in the country. It’s a testament to the quality of both our students and faculty. We continue to make major strides in a variety of areas, including improvement to facilities, increased focus on career services and continued commitment to excellence in teaching. This ranking by BusinessWeek is a strong endorsement of our efforts to make our undergraduate program one of the premier programs in the country.”

The ranking comes as USD is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2009. “To receive this honor during our anniversary year only adds to the joy and pride we feel in the university’s tremendous accomplishments in such a short period of time,” said USD President Mary E. Lyons.

At USD, more than 850 undergraduate business students can choose from bachelor’s degrees in accountancy, economics and business administration with majors in business administration, business economics, marketing and finance.

The hallmarks of USD’s undergraduate business program are rigor, relevance, and personalized service that complement the liberal arts, values-based education that USD students receive. USD also offers a full and part-time MBA and international MBA program as well as master’s degrees in accountancy, leadership, real estate and supply supply chain management, and taxation.

USD’s rise was not the only notable change on this year’s list. The University of Virginia is now number one and the University of Note Dame, number two. Last year’s top-ranked school, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, is now number three.

While there are more than 1,600 business schools in the United States, BusinessWeek only considered schools accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) for inclusion in the ranking.  From the list of more than 500 undergraduate business programs with AACSB accreditation, they narrowed the list down to the top 101 schools for inclusion in the ranking.

To rank these programs, BusinessWeek uses nine distinct measures, including surveys of some 85,000 business majors and nearly 600 corporate recruiters, the median starting salaries for graduates, and the number of graduates each program sends on to the preeminent MBA programs. BusinessWeek also calculated an academic quality score for the undergraduate schools by combining SAT scores, faculty-student ratios, class size, the percentage of students with internships, and the number of hours students spend on class work each week.

For more information on the list go to http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/toc/09_10/B4122undergrad_business.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index+-+temp_news+%2B+analysis.

The University of San Diego School of Business Administration is committed to developing socially responsible leaders and improving global business practice through innovative, personalized education and applied research. Go to www.sandiego.edu/business.

The University of San Diego is a Catholic institution of higher learning chartered in 1949; the school enrolls some 7,500 undergraduate and graduate students and is known for its commitment to teaching, the liberal arts, the formation of values and community service. The inauguration of the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies brings the University’s total number of schools and colleges to six. Other academic divisions include the College of Arts and Sciences and the schools of Business Administration, Leadership and Education Sciences, Law and Nursing and Health Sciences.

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